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Newspaper citation, January 27, 2002. The Indianapolis Star. “City Wages Fight to Save Young Lives.”

  • Newspaper citation, July 9, 2002. The Indianapolis Star. “Killings Down in City Center, Up in County.”

  • Newspaper citation, August 10, 2002.The Indianapolis Star. “Fascination with Forensics Hits Undergrads.”

  • Newspaper citation, September 30, 2002. The Indianapolis Star. “Streetlights Desirable But Not For City Budget.”

  • Newspaper citations, December 6&7, 2001. The Indianapolis Star. “Homicides”.

  • Newspaper feature story. April 9, 2001.The Indianapolis Star “Professor tries to debunk myth that homicide rate keeps rising”.

  • Newspaper citation, The Indianapolis Star, “Homicides Haunt Black community” February 26, 2001.

  • Radio interview, WIBC, Murder in America. Correspondent Cheryl Miller, November 27, 2000.

  • Television Appearances, Local CBS, ABC, NBC and FOX-TV news affiliates, Topic: Committee Appointment to Select New IPD Chief. December 7, 8 1996.

  • Newspaper citation, The Indianapolis Star, “War on Drugs: A Costly Failure” by Janet Williams and Jennifer Smith. October 6, 1996.

  • Radio Talk Show, WTLC, Topic: Community Policing. August 15, 1996.

  • Newspaper citation, South Bend Tribune, “Ads Distort Indy Crime Rates: GOP Foes Use Faulty Statistics in Campaigns: by Susan Dillman. April 5, 1996.

  • Newspaper citation, NUVO News, “Dangerous Finds: Do You Know What’s In Your Kid’s Locker?” by Matt Keating, April 4, 1996.

  • Television, Topic: Community Policing Citizen Surveys. FOX-TV, November 23, 27 1996.

  • Newspaper citation, Nationally syndicated column by Steve Chapman, The False Hope Behind Banning Assault Weapons.” December 24, 1995.

  • Television Appearance, Topic: Crime Displacement, CBS News local affiliate, WISH-TV. February 28, 1995.

  • Television Appearance, Topic: The Death Penalty, The Top Story, CBS News local affiliate, Indianapolis, IN, December 11, 1994.

  • Television Appearance, Topic: Police line of duty deaths, ABC News local affiliate, Indianapolis, IN, August 24, 1993.

  • Television Appearance, Topic: Serial Murder, Round Table, NBC News local affiliate, Champaign, IL, August 1991.

  • Radio Talk Show, WGN Talk Radio. One-hour program on Crime and Violence, January 12, 1992.

  • Newspaper citation, Feature Series, “Crime: Behind Our Fear.” Indianapolis Star, August 21, 24, 28 1994.

  • Newspaper citation, Feature Article, “Police Review Board Proposal Stirs Debate.” May 6, 1993.

  • Newspaper citation, Feature-related Article, “Freshman View: ‘The Worst is Behind Me,’” Chicago Tribune, June 23, 1992.

  • Newspaper citation, “Professor Questions Gainesville Leads,” The Daily Eastern News, September 5, 1990.

    Professional Training and Certifications

    2006, Homicide Investigator’s course certification (16 hours). Indiana Violent Crime and Homicide Investigator’s Association. Training on line of duty deaths and serial murder case investigation.

    2005, Homicide Investigator’s course certification (20 hours). Indiana Violent Crime and Homicide Investigator’s Association. Training by Vernon Geberth.

    2002, Mental Preparedness for Combat (8 hours), sponsored by IUPUI Police and Indianapolis Police Department. Training by Lt. Col. Grossman.

    Professional Societies and Memberships

    • American Society of Criminology

    • Indiana Homicide & Violent Crime Investigator’s Association

    • Homicide Research Working Group

    Curriculum Vitae

    Thomas D. Stucky

    School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    Indiana University Purdue University- Indianapolis

    Business/ Spea 4069

    801 W. Michigan St.

    Indianapolis, Indiana 46202

    Office Phone: (317) 274-3462

    tstucky@iupui.edu

    Academic Appointments:

    7/2008-present Associate Professor, IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

    8/2004- 6/2008: Assistant Professor, IUPUI School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

    8/2001-6/2004: Assistant Professor and Criminal Justice Program Coordinator, Division of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University Purdue University at Fort Wayne (IPFW).

    Education:

    2001 Ph.D. Sociology, University of Iowa.

    1997 M.A. Sociology, University of Iowa.

    1991 B.A (2). Sociology, Psychology, Ohio University, summa cum laude.

    Specialty Areas:

    Criminology, Criminal Justice, Social Control, Political Sociology.

    Professional Organizations:

    American Society of Criminology

    American Sociological Association

    Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences

    Honors And Awards:

    2007 Indiana University Trustee’s Teaching Award, $2,500.

    2007 Named Faculty Research Fellow, Indiana University Center for Criminal Justice Research.

    2005 Nominated as Favorite Professor by an IUPUI Student Athlete.

    2003-2004 IPFW Research Fellow. Fellows received a course reduction and other support to write grants for external funding.

    2003 Nominated for IPFW Outstanding Contribution to a Student Organization Award.

    2001 Second Prize, Gene Carte Student Paper Competition, American Society of Criminology.

    1995-2000 Democratization Graduate Traineeship, National Science Foundation

    1991 Outstanding Graduate, Department of Sociology, Ohio University.

    1990 Inducted Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi.

    1987-1991 Ohio Board of Regents Scholarship.

    1988-1991 Ohio University Dean's Scholarship.

    Grants and Fellowships:

    2007 IUPUI Jumpstart Grant to develop online Introduction to Criminology Course, $5,000.

    2003 IPFW Diversity Initiative Grant, $1,500.

    2003 IPFW Summer Research Grant, $7,000.

    2002 IPFW Library Special Needs Grant, $3,000.

    2000 National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant, Sociology Program

    #SBR-0002291, $3,329.

    2000 Dissertation Improvement Award, Graduate College, University of Iowa, $350.

    Research Contracts:

    2008 Principal Investigator, Center for Criminal Justice Research, Indiana University- Purdue University at Indianapolis.  Research partner for Comprehensive Anti-Gang Initiative.  Contract with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Indiana, 7/1/08- 6/30/09, $50,000.  

    Refereed Publications

    2009 Kaminski, Robert J., and Thomas D. Stucky. “Reassessing Political Explanations for Murders of Police.” Homicide Studies 13:3-20.

    2008 Messner, Steven F., Glenn D. Deane, Thomas D. Stucky, Charis E. Kubrin, and Kelly McGeever. “Not ‘Islands, Entire of Themselves’: Exploring the Spatial Context of City-Level Robbery Rates.” Journal of QuantitativeCriminology 24:363-380.

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D., Geralyn M. Miller, and Linda Murphy. “Gender, Guns, and Legislating: An Analysis of State Legislative Policy Preferences.” Journal of Women, Politics, and Policy 29:477-496.

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D.Improving Student Course Outcomes Through Increased Instructor Monitoring of Attendance.” Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 8:61-71.

    2007 Stucky, Thomas D., Karen Heimer, and Joseph B. Lang. “A Bigger Piece of the Pie? An Analysis of State Corrections Spending Over Time.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 44:91-123.

    2005 Stucky, Thomas D., Karen Heimer, and Joseph B. Lang. “Partisan Politics, Electoral Competition, and Imprisonment: An Analysis of States over Time.” Criminology 43:211-248.

    2005 Stucky, Thomas D. “Local Politics and Police Strength.” Justice Quarterly 22: 139-169.

    2003 Stucky, Thomas D. “Local Politics and Violent Crime in U.S. Cities.” Criminology 41:1101-1136.

    Reprinted (2006) in Crime and Social Institutions (Richard Rosenfeld, editor). Hampshire, UK: Ashgate Publishing Ltd.

    Books

    2009 Kubrin, Charis E., Thomas D. Stucky, and Marvin D. Krohn. Testing Theories of Crime and Deviance. Oxford University Press.

    2005 Stucky, Thomas D. Urban Politics, Crime Rates, and Police Strength. New York: LFB Scholarly Publishing.

    Papers under Review

    Stucky, Thomas D., and John R. Ottensmann. “Land Use and Violent Crime.” Revise and resubmit at Criminology.

    Kubrin, Charis E., Steven F. Messner, Glenn D. Deane, Kelly McGeever, and Thomas D. Stucky. “Proactive Policing and Robbery Rates Across Large U.S. Cities: Assessing Robustness.” Revise and resubmit at Criminology.

    Stucky, Thomas D. “The Conditional Effects of Race and Politics on Social Control: Black Violent Crime Arrests in Large Cities, 1970-1990.” Under review at Justice Quarterly.

    Research in Progress

    Stucky, Thomas D., John R. Ottensmann. “Exploring the Spatial Correspondence of Residential Locations of Registered Sex Offenders and Reported Sex and Non-Sex Crimes.”

    Stucky, Thomas D., and Sheila Suess Kennedy. “Sin and Crime: Exploring the Role of Religious Worldviews in Attitudes on Crime and Punishment.”

    Heimer, Karen , Thomas D. Stucky, and Joseph B. Lang. “Exploring Differences across States and over Time in the Effect of Race on Incarceration Rates.”

    Non-Refereed Publications

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D., Samuel Nunn, and Kenna Quinet. “Promising Strategies for Reducing Gun Violence in Indianapolis: A Report to Indiana Project Safe Neighborhoods.” Summer 2008, IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2008 Nunn, Samuel, William Newby, Thomas D. Stucky, and Kenna F. Quinet. “Synthesizing Recommendations from Review of Indiana Criminal Justice Institute Funding Streams and Evaluation of Sub-grantees.” Spring 2008, IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D. Review of Rosevelt L. Noble’s book, Black Rage in the American Prison System. 2006, LFB Scholarly Publishing. Forthcoming in Criminal Justice Review.

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D. Review of Laura Huey’s book, Negotiating Demands: The Politics of Skid Row Policing in Edinburgh, San Francisco, and Vancouver. 2007, University of Toronto Press. Forthcoming in Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice.

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D., William Newby, and Samuel Nunn. “Analysis of Byrne/JAG Programs Administered by the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute: Multi-jurisdictional (Drug) Task Forces, 2006 and 2007.” IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2007 Stucky, Thomas D., and Rachel Thelin. “Timely and Accurate Data Reporting is Key to Fighting Crime.” IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2006 Stucky, Thomas D., William Newby, and Samuel Nunn. “Analysis of Federal Grant Programs Administered by the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute: Edward Byrne Memorial/ Justice Assistance Grants; Drug Courts and Prosecutors, Forensic Diversion, and Gang Task Force”IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2006 Quinet, Kenna F., G. Roger Jarjoura, Robert Brown, Thomas D. Stucky, Samuel Nunn, and William Newby. “Performance Metrics for ICJI, 2006.” IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2006 Stucky, Thomas D., and John Ottensmann. “Indianapolis Study: Land Use Affects Crime Incidence.” IUPUI Center for Urban Policy and the Environment.

    2003 Stucky, Thomas D. “Crime and Justice.” Chapter in The State of Black Fort Wayne, 2002.

    Other Professional Activities:

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D., John R. Ottensmann. “Exploring the Spatial Correspondence of Residential Locations of Registered Sex Offenders and Reported Sex and Non-Sex Crimes.” Paper scheduled for presentation at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, St. Louis.

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D., and G. Roger Jarjoura. “Effective Crime Prevention Strategies: A Town Hall Forum.” North United Methodist Church, Indianapolis, Indiana hosted by State Representative David Orentlicher (3/16).

    2008 Stucky, Thomas D., and Samuel Nunn. “Strategies for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Court-based Alcohol and Drug Programs.” Invited lecture to senior alcohol and drug court administrators sponsored by the Indiana Judicial Council (2/18).

    2007 Stucky, Thomas D. “Effective Crime Prevention Strategies.” Invited lecture to the Indiana Agricultural Leadership Institute, Terre Haute, Indiana (3/31).

    2007 Heimer, Karen, Matthew Boswell, Thomas D. Stucky, and Joseph B. Lang. “Race, Threat, and Imprisonment” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta.

    2006 Stucky, Thomas D., and John Ottensmann. “Land Use and Crime: Implications for Theory and Research.” Invited lecture on 11/10 for the graduate research colloquium in the Department of Criminal Justice, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.

    2006 Stucky, Thomas D., and John Ottensmann. “Land Use and Crime: Implications for Theory and Research.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Los Angeles.

    2006 Heimer, Karen, Joseph B. Lang, and Thomas D. Stucky. “Race, Threat, and Imprisonment.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Toronto.

    2006 Stucky, Thomas D., and John Ottensmann. “Land Use and Crime.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Baltimore.

    2006 Stucky, Thomas D., and Sheila Kennedy. “Sin and Crime: The Role of Religious Worldviews in Shaping Criminal Justice Policies.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the Law and Society Association, Baltimore.

    2005 Kaminsky, Robert J., and Thomas D. Stucky. “The Killing of Police: A Replication and Extension of Jacobs and Carmichael.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Toronto.

    2004 Stucky, Thomas D., Karen Heimer, and Joseph B. Lang. “The Conditional Effects of Politics on State Prison Admissions in the U.S. States from 1977-1998.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the Law and Society Association, Chicago.

    2003 Stucky, Thomas D. “Investigating the Relationship Between Local Politics, Segregation and Crime in 100 Large U.S. Cities, 1970‑1990."; Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Denver.

    2003 Miller, Geralyn M., Linda Murphy, and Thomas D. Stucky. “Gender, Guns, and Legislating: An Analysis of State Legislative Policy Preferences.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago.

    2002 Stucky, Thomas D. ";A Pooled Cross- Sectional Time Series Analysis of State Corrections Expenditures from 1974 to 1996."; Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago.

    2002 Stucky, Thomas D. “An Institutional Resource Perspective on Crime Control: 900 U.S. Cities in 1991.” Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Sociological Association, Chicago.

    2001 Stucky, Thomas D. ";City Politics, Social Disorganization, and Crime."; Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta.

    2001 Heimer, Karen, Halime Unal, Joseph B. Lang, Thomas D. Stucky ";Gendered Justice: Variation in the Gender Gap in Imprisonment in the U.S."; Paper presented at the annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta.

    Courses Taught:

    J101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    J101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (online)

    J201 Theoretical Foundations of Criminal Justice

    J202 Criminal Justice Data, Methods, and Resources

    J260 Crime: It Could Happen to You

    J260 America's Prison Boom

    J370 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice

    J439 Crime and Public Policy

    V170 Introduction to Public Affairs

    K300 Statistics for Public Affairs

    J501 Criminological Theory (graduate)

    J502 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (graduate)

    J666 Criminal Justice Programs and Policies (graduate)

    Professional Service:

    2007 Session Organizer for Annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta.

    2006 Session Organizer for Annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Los Angeles.

    2006 Reviewer for Sage text Criminology: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    2000-07 Occasional reviewer for American Sociological Review (1), Criminology (2), Journal of Criminal Justice (1), Justice Quarterly (6), The Sociological Quarterly (11), Social Problems (1), Sociological Perspectives (1).

    2004 Editorial Reviewer for Francis Cullen and Robert Agnew’s

    Criminological Theories: Past to Present text.

    2003 Session Organizer for Annual meetings of the American Society of Criminology, Denver.

    2003Editorial Reviewer for Joel Samaha’s Criminal Justice text.

    Public Service

    2008- Member Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department Crisis Intervention Team Steering Committee

    2006 Consultant to Indianapolis Mayor’s Task Force on Crime Prevention.

    2006- Member Midtown Mental Health Board.

    2005- Member Indianapolis Race Relations Leadership Network.

    2003-05 Member Criminal Justice/Criminology Pathways Committee, Indiana Task Force on Higher Education

    2004 Discussed State of Black Fort Wayne Chapter at “All Things Local” at Border’s Bookstore, May22, 2004.

    2003-04 Member, Fort Wayne Urban League Advocacy Committee.

    2003-04 Evaluated validity of certification examinations for National Association of Forensic Counselors in support of their efforts to attain accreditation through the National Organization for Competency Assurance.

    2003 Forum participant for meet the authors session (10/5) sponsored by the Fort Wayne Urban League on its publication The State of Black Fort Wayne, 2002.

    2003 Facilitator of talkback session (9/13) on local play Spinning Into Butter, which dealt with diversity and racism on college campuses.

    2002-03 Member Anthis Career Center (Fort Wayne, IN) Criminal Justice Curriculum Advisory Board.

    UNIVERSITY SERVICE:

    2008- Member IUPUI Information Technology Dean’s Council.

    2008 Member IUPUI Program Review and Assessment Committee.

    2005-2007 Faculty Secretary, School of Public and Environmental Affairs, IUPUI.

    2004-2006 Member Indiana Project for Academic Success Committee (IUPUI). Goal of committee was to generate and assess strategies to increase student retention and success in gateway courses.

    2006 Member, Ad hoc committee to propose new financial incentives for SPEA IUPUI faculty.

    2006 Member Public Safety Lecturer Search Committee (IUPUI).

    2004-2008 Member Graduate Admissions Committee (IUPUI).

    2004-2008 Member Criminal Justice Curriculum Committee (IUPUI).

    2004-2007 Participated in SPEA IUPUI graduate and undergraduate orientations in Fall and Spring.

    2003-2004 Member faculty committee to develop Masters of Public Management degree (IPFW).

    2001-2004 Criminal Justice Program Coordinator (IPFW).

    2001-2004 Chair, Criminal Justice Program Committee (IPFW).

    2003-2004 Member, ad hoc committee to enhance diversity within the Division of

    Public and Environmental Affairs at IPFW.

    2004 SPEA representative on IPFW Researcher of the Year Committee.

    2004 SPEA representative on IPFW Summer Undergraduate Research Awards Committee.

    2004 Member and DPEA representative on IPFW Research Fellows Selection Committee.

    2002-2004 Member Faculty Senate General Education Subcommittee (IPFW).

    2002-2004 Member Faculty Senate Graduate Committee (IPFW).

    2002-2003 Member SPEA Tenure Track Faculty in Criminal Justice Search Committee.

    2001-2002 Member University Task Force on First Year Students (IPFW).

    2001-2008 Supervised 18 student internships

    2001-2004 Advisor to IPFW chapter of American Criminal Justice Fraternity- Lambda Alpha Epsilon.

    2001-2003 Advisor, IPFW chapter Alpha Phi Sigma, National Criminal Justice Honor Society

    VITA

    NAME: White, James, Robert

    EDUCATION:

    BS, Criminal Justice, IUPUI, 1979

    MS, Education, Butler University, 1982

    ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS:

    Public Safety Clinical Lecturer, August 2006

    OTHER APPOINTMENTS AND PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTSHIPS:

    Member Indiana Department of Homeland Security – Emergency Management Higher Education Advisory

    Board – 2006 to present

    LICENSURE AND CERTIFICATION: None

    PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES:

    Lifetime member Indiana University Alumni Association

    Lifetime member Association of the United States Army

    Lifetime member National Guard Association of the United States

    Lifetime member Indiana National Guard Association

    Lifetime member U.S. Army Field Artillery Association

    HONORS:

    Indiana University Alumni Association President’s award, 2006

    TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS:

    J-100 – SPEA Bridge Program (2007 to present)

    J-101 - The American Criminal Justice System (2002 to present)

    J-150 - Public Safety in America (2006 to present)

    J-260 – Are you ready (2008 to present)

    V-260 – Are you ready (2008 to present)

    J-380 – SPEA Internship (2007 to present

    J-376 - Principles of Public Safety (2007 to present)

    V-375 – Emergency Services Administration (2006 to present)

    J-429 – Public Safety Management and Leadership (Capstone) (2009 to present)

    J-480 – Research in Criminal Justice (2008 to present)

    SERVICES:

    Member IUPUI Emergency Planning Advisory Committee – 2006 to present

    Member Indianapolis Hamilton County Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) Working Group -2006 to present

    Member, Marion County Emergency Planning Committee – 2005 to present

    Lecturer, Indiana State Police Academy – 1977 to present

    Lecturer, Indiana Law Enforcement Academy – 1996 to present

    Lecturer, Indiana Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Police Executive Leadership Academy- 2002 to present

    PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES:

    Reserve - Indianapolis-Marion County Emergency Management Agency – 2006 to present

    GRANTS, FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS: None

    PUBLICATIONS: None

    Appendix F.Analysis of Demand for Masters Degrees in Criminal Justice

    Data

    The analysis compares the numbers of Master’s degrees awarded in different geographical areas to measures of the potential demand for such degrees, total population and the numbers of persons employed in criminal justice occupations.

    Numbers of degrees awarded by institution in criminal justice and related fields from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2006 were obtained from data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics, Integrated Postsecondary Data Education System. (These are the most current data currently available as of August 2008.) The data were downloaded from

    http://nces.ed.gov/ipedspas/dct/index.asp on August 25, 2008.Data were obtained for all institutions (229) awarding Master’s degrees in the following categories:

    Criminal justice and corrections, codes 43.0102-43.0199

    Criminology, code 45.0401

    (Those are the IPDES degree codes.) While the proposed degree is for criminal justice and public safety, there are no categories degrees in public safety. Most of the degree categories relating to fire safety relate to fire science or similar technology-based degrees. While there is a category for fire safety management, only one institution awarded Master’s degrees (and only 9) in this category. So the decision was made to focus only on criminal justice-related degrees. Data on population, as one measure of demand, were obtained from Census 2000 and were downloaded from http://www.census.gov/main/www/cen2000.html on March 21, 2006. Data on the number of persons employed in criminal justice-related occupations were obtained from the Bureau of Labor Statistics for the nation and the states. Because metropolitan area definitions have changed since the 2000 census, the 2006 BLS employment data for metropolitan areas were incompatible with the MSA population data for 2000. Therefore, to make the population and employment data comparable, employment data for MSAs for persons employed in criminal justice-related occupations were obtained for 2000. These data were downloaded from http://www.bls.gov/oes/oes_dl.htm on March 21 and 22, 2006. Data were obtained for the following occupation categories:

    BLS occupation codes included

    occ_code

    occ_title

    21-1092

    Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

    33-1011

    First-line supervisors/managers of correctional officers

    33-1012

    First-line supervisors/managers of police and detectives

    33-1099

    First-line supervisors/managers, protective service workers, all other

    33-3011

    Bailiffs

    33-3012

    Correctional officers and jailers

    33-3021

    Detectives and criminal investigators

    33-3031

    Fish and game wardens

    33-3041

    Parking enforcement workers

    33-3051

    Police and sheriff's patrol officers

    33-3052

    Transit and railroad police

    33-9011

    Animal control workers

    33-9021

    Private detectives and investigators

    33-9031

    Gaming surveillance officers and gaming investigators

    33-9032

    Security guards

    33-9099

    Protective service workers, all other

    (Those are the BLS occupation codes.) Once again, because the Master’s degree data are for criminal justice-related degrees, criminal justice-related occupations were selected and occupations related to public safety were not included.

    Analysis of Degrees in Relation to Measures of Demand

    This section analyzes the numbers of Master’s degrees awarded in relation to the two measures of demand, population and persons employed in criminal justice-related occupations. Three sets of comparisons are made: Indiana versus the nation as a whole, Indiana versus surrounding states, and the Indianapolis Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) versus other large MSAs.

    The assumption is made that the Master’s degrees awarded in an area would go towards meeting the demand for such degrees in that area. This is necessarily only an approximation. Some students will choose to obtain a degree from an institution in another area (and may return to their original place of residence). Institutions, especially near the border of other areas, may contribute to the meeting of the demand for Master’s degrees in those other areas. And some of the larger, more prominent degree programs will attract students regionally or even nationally, thereby contributing to the meeting of the demand for criminal justice degrees over broader areas. We do expect to attract out-of-state students by year 3 of the degree.

    One exceptional case exists within Indiana. Calumet College of St. Joseph is located in Whiting, Indiana. Being very close to Illinois, it would be reasonable to assume that they might be likely to attract significant numbers of students from Illinois, at least in part meeting the demand for Master’s degrees in Illinois. Under the assumption made above, however, those degrees would appropriately still be considered as meeting the needs in Indiana. However, according to their website, their Master of Science in Law Enforcement Administration/Public Safety Administration (they are changing the name of the degree) is offered at three locations—at the main campus in Whiting, at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, and at the Chicago Police Academy in Chicago. It would seem logical to conclude that degrees awarded to students participating at the latter two locations would primarily be serving to meet demand in Illinois. No information is available as to the numbers of the Master’s degrees awarded by that institution that are awarded to students studying at the various locations. The most reasonable assumption would seem to be that equal number of degrees are awarded to students studying at each location. So two-thirds of the degrees awarded should be allocated to Illinois and one-third to Indiana, based upon two of the three locations being located in Illinois. This is how those degrees were allocated in the analyses reported here.

    Indiana versus the United States

    We start by comparing the number of Master’s degrees and the measures of demand for Indiana with the totals for the United States. The following table reports the total numbers of 2006 Master’s degrees awarded, total population, and employment in criminal related occupations as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

    The table also reports the number of Master’s degrees per 100,000 population and per 100,000 persons employed in criminal justice-related occupations. For the United States as a whole, the ratio of degrees to population is nearly twice as great as the ratio in Indiana. It is also much larger (though not quite as large) for the ratio of degrees to employment.

    Indiana versus the Surrounding States

    The next comparison relates the same information for Indiana to the data for the surrounding states:

    The ratio of criminal-justice-related Master’s degrees to both population and employment is greater in all of the surrounding states than in Indiana. Some are only slightly higher, while other ratios are over twice those for Indiana. The mean of the ratio of degrees to population for the four surrounding states is nearly twice as high as the ratio for Indiana. The mean of the ratio of degrees to employment for the four states is well over twice that of Indiana.

    Indianapolis Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) versus 50 Largest MSAs

    For universities in large metropolitan areas, the populations of those areas can constitute a major part of the market of their degrees. It is therefore appropriate to consider the number of criminal justice-related degrees in the 50 largest areas, along with the populations and numbers employed in criminal justice-related occupations. No Master’s degrees in criminal justice were awarded in the Indianapolis MSA.

    The following table presents the same information as the previous tables—degrees awarded, population, employment—for the 50 largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas in the United States in 2000. The areas are arranged in decreasing order of MSA population:

    The ratios of degrees per population and degrees per employment vary widely across the MSAs. The Indianapolis MSA is one of only 4 MSAs in which no Master’s degrees in criminal justice or related fields were awarded in 2005-2006. As the twenty-eighth largest MSA in 2000, Indianapolis was the largest area in which no Master’s degrees were awarded.

    The mean across the fifty largest MSAs of Master’s degrees per hundred thousand population was higher than the value for the nation as a whole and the mean across the four surrounding states. The mean across the fifty largest MSAs of Master’s degrees per hundred thousand employees was higher than the value for the nation as a whole as well. This suggests that metropolitan areas may be particularly strong markets for Master’s degrees in criminal justice.

    Estimation of Total and Unmet Demand for Indiana and Indianapolis

    The analysis presented above provides a basis for estimating the total and unmet demand for Master’s degrees in criminal justice for Indiana and for the Indianapolis MSA. We take the ratios of numbers of Master’s degrees to population and employment for the nation and the means for the four surrounding states and multiply those by the Indiana population and employment in criminal justice-related occupations as measures of the potential demand for criminal justice degrees in Indiana. For the Indianapolis MSA, we take the mean ratios for the 50 largest MSAs multiplied by the Indianapolis MSA population and employment in criminal justice-related occupations to produce measures of the potential demand for criminal justice degrees in the Indianapolis MSA. Subtracting the actual numbers of Master’s degrees awarded in Indiana and the Indianapolis MSA provides measures of the unmet demand, which can be taken as estimates of the potential demand for additional Master’s degree in criminal justice in Indiana and the Indianapolis MSA. This reported in the following table:

    Forecasts of Program Enrollment and Degrees Awarded

    Looking at the figures for unmet demand, the range of the numbers is somewhat higher for the estimates for the state of Indiana than for the Indianapolis MSA. While the proposed degree program would undoubtedly serve students and meet demand beyond the MSA, we can acknowledge that it would not necessarily be expected to meet all of the unmet demand for criminal justice degrees for the entire state of Indiana. A conservative approach would be to focus on the figures for the unmet demand for the Indianapolis MSA. Then the relevant estimates would be for an unmet demand of 28 to 39 criminal justice degrees. These are still sufficiently high to make it reasonable to use the lower of those two estimates of unmet demand, 28 degrees per year, as the working estimate of demand for criminal justice degrees. Again, this is a very conservative because the proposed degree is for the Master’s in criminal justice and public safety, and this estimate of demand relates only to criminal justice.

    The estimate of unmet demand of 28 degrees per year, allows for a conservative estimate of 10 new students in the first year and by year 5, 40 new students, some full-time, some part-time. For the 36-credit hour degree, this would be 4 semesters for full-time students and 8 semesters for part-time students (assuming 3 courses per semester for full-time students and 2 courses per semester for part-time students). Although in past years, there were significantly more part-time students in the SPEA IUPUI MPA program, as of fall 2008, 44% of MPA graduate students are full-time (8 or more credits) and 56% of MPA students are part-time. Using this breakdown to forecast program enrollment and degrees awarded Table 1 (appended) shows a five year forecast of credit hours and program majors for the MCJPS.

    Appendix G. Letters of support



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