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A guide to undergraduate courses at the University of Crete

  1. Information on degree programmes

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

PROGRAMME OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

Qualification

The Department of Philology has a rich and flexible Programme of Undergraduate Studies with numerous options and a comparatively small number of compulsory courses; it constist of 55 courses amounting to 240 ECTS credits and requires a period of at least 8 semesters for completion.

Successful participation in all exams and fulfilment of all necessary attendance requirements leads to the awarding of:

- a B.A. degree (Bachelor of Arts / Ptychion) in Greek Philology with specialization in one of the following areas: Classical Studies; Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology; Linguistics; and Theatre/ Cinema Studies and Musicology.

Objectives and goals

The Programme of Undergraduate Studies has been so designed as to serve the main objectives of the Department of Philology which are first, to practice and promote studies within its broad subject area (Classical, Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology, Linguistics, Theatre/ Cinema Studies and Musicology) by means of academic teaching and scholarly research; and second, to provide its students with the essential knowledge and skills which will ensure that they are thoroughly prepared for a career in a relevant professional field. In this way, it aims both at improving the quality of secondary education and at advancing scholarship in the area of Greek Philology.

As regards its structure and content, the Programme aims at cultivating the values of theoretical and applied knowledge, as well as scholarly research, as part of the professional profile of its graduates. Moreover, the Programme aims both at providing students with a general training in philology and at offering the opportunity for some basic specialization in the subject area of one of the Department's four Divisions: a. Classical Studies, b. Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology, c. Linguistics and d. Theatre/ Cinema Studies and Musicology.

Material and technical resources: To serve the needs of its Programme of Studies, the Department of Philology has various material and technical resources at its disposal. First of all, there are modern seminars rooms and amphitheatres with all the necessary equipment. In addition, the Department has four laboratories attached to their respective Divisions: (1) The Papyrology and Epigraphy Laboratory, serving the teaching and research needs in these fields; (2) The Paleography Laboratory and Microfilm Archive, serving research and teaching needs in the fields of paleography and codicology, but also in the broader fields of history and philology of Byzantium and the Modern Greek world; (3) The Linguistics Laboratory, the scope of which is to apply modern technological methods and techniques in developing research in topics within the broad field of both theoretical and applied linguistics; (4) The Theatre Studies and Musicology Laboratory, serving teaching and research needs in the fields of theatre, music and cinema, with its own extensive collection of slides, records, books and films as well as modern audiovisual equipment.

Under the auspices of the Division of Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology, the Logios Ermis Website has been created to function as an information bank on research and teaching in Modern Greek studies throughout the world (http://logiosermis.phl.uoc.gr).

The University Library, to which all students have access with lending rights, has one of the largest collections in Greece in the fields of literary studies, linguistics, theatre, film studies and musicology. It has an exceptionally rich collection of scholarly journals and numerous on-line connections with all major scientific and bibliographical databases. There is also a computer laboratory for students to use as an information, training and communication resource.

  • Access to further studies

The broad subject area that the degree of our Department covers allows our graduate students to apply to a vast number of postgraduate programmes in Greece and abroad. Admission to a postgraduate programme, however, is subject to a student’s overall performance during his/ her undergraduate studies. Students with a low grade (D-E) degree have only restricted chances of finding a place in a graduate programme; students intending to continue their studies must obtain a degree within a range from A to C (see below for the grading system). Graduates of our Department have completed postgraduate studies in all major Universities of Europe and the United States with remarkable results and have in many cases pursued a successful academic career in Greece and abroad.

The Department of Philology itself runs a programme of postgraduate studies with specialization in Classical Philology, Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology, Linguistics and Theatre/ Cinema Studies. The programme aims at producing young scholars with advanced knowledge and skills in their professional fields, and particularly in qualifying its graduates for positions in research institutes and university departments. It offers degrees at the levels of Master and Doctorate. During their studies students have the opportunity to participate in research programmes run by the Institute of Mediterranean Studies, a research institute overseen by the Secretariat-General for Research and Technology and carrying out various research projects.

  • Structure of the Programme

  1. Time structure – Duration

The Programme consists of 55 courses which are offered on a semester basis. There are two semesters per academic year and each semester consists of at least fifteen weeks: thirteen teaching weeks and two weeks for examinations. The exact dates of the Semesters are determined by the University Senate and are announced annually, but usually, the Winter Semester (teaching period) begins in late September and ends before Christmas, and the Spring Semester (teaching period) begins in mid-February and ends in late May.

Students are expected to complete their studies and graduate within four academic years or eight semesters, which may be extended to two more years. After that period the students who have failed to fulfill the requirements of the programme lose all their rights and privileges, such as health and hospital insurance and coverage, grants, scholarships, loans, free meals, room accommodation, books, transportation assistance, etc.

  1. Course description – form, content and credits

  • The courses may be distinguished as Compulsory and Elective and may take

the form of Exercise courses, Lectures, Seminars, and Foreign Language Instruction. Exercise courses are open to all students and their aim is to provide students with the basics of an area of study. Lectures are also open to all, and their aim is to introduce students to a particular area of study. Seminars are open to advanced students who have completed the prerequisite courses, and participation is limited to a maximum of 25 students; in seminars students are introduced to the methodologies of research and are required to investigate a specific topic, make an oral presentation and submit a written paper at the end of the Semester. Foreign Language Instruction is offered in the English, German, French, Italian and Spanish Language, and the students, after a placement test, are required to complete successfully four courses (corresponding to 8 ECTS credits all together).

  • All courses are taught three hours per week, and students may enroll in up

to eight courses per semester. The content of each course, the method of assessment and the basic bibliography of the subject are announced in the beginning of the course. A brief summary of all the above information is available before the beginning of each academic year and is included in the ECTS catalogue.

  • To combine general philological training with elementary specialization in one of the four Divisions of the Department, the Undergraduate Programme contains a number of basic or general compulsory subjects (code title: ΥΕΦ), as well as additional specialized subjects (ΥΕΤ). It also includes a number of courses (ΥΕΓ) offered by other Departments of the Faculty of Arts (Philosophy, History, Archaeology, Education), and it finally gives the opportunity for some completely free options (ΕΛΕ).

  • Specialization is put into practice in the beginning of the third semester, when students declare the Division, in which they wish to specialize, and begin to attend the relevant courses. More specifically:

Division of Classical Studies: courses in epic poetry, lyric poetry (archaic and postclassical periods), drama (tragedy, comedy and satyr-play), historiography, philosophical prose and rhetoric, the ancient novel, aspects of ancient Greek culture, etc. A long reading list of prescribed ancient Greek and Latin texts, in which students must also be examined in order to obtain their degree, is also included in the specialized programme of this Division.

Division of Byzantine and Modern Greek Philology: Byzantine religious poetry and hymnography, Byzantine secular literature, Byzantine historiography and chronicles, late Byzantine philology, Cretan and Heptanesian literature, literature of the Enlightenment period, Modern Greek literature from the 19th century to the present day, etc. A long reading list of prescribed Byzantine and Modern Greek texts, in which students must also be examined in order to obtain their degree, is also included in the specialized programme of this Division.

Division of Linguistics: dialectology, ethnolinguistics, sociolinguistics, computational linguistics, philosophy of language, psycholinguistics, historical linguistics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, semiotics, etc.

Division of Theatre/ Cinema Studies and Musicology: units from the history and theory of theatre and cinema (Modern Greek and International), ethnomusicology etc.

The basic structure of the programme described above can compendiously and diagrammatically be presented as follows:

COURSES CATEGORIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

A) Core Courses or ΥΕΦ (Philology Obligatory Electives): 28 (ECTS per course: 4, except ΑΕΦ 100 and ΝΕΦ 100 which value 6 ECTS)

8 courses ΑΕΦ (010 + 020 + 100 + 5 genre areas (Epos/Lyric poetry/Drama/Historiography/Philosophy-Rhetoric)

5 courses ΛΑΦ (010 + 020 + 100 + 1 poetry + 1 prose)

4 courses ΒΥΦ (100 + 3 genre areas (Hymnography-Hagiography/ Historiography- Chronography/Learned Byzantine Literature)

6 courses ΝΕΦ (100 + period up to 1669 + period 1669-1850 + period 1850-1930 + period 1930– today + Literary Theory/Literary Criticism/Comparative Literature

4 courses ΓΛΩΦ (100 + 101 + Syntax + Modern Greek Grammar)

1 course ΝΕΘ (Modern Greek Theatre)

B) Courses ΥΕΓ (General Obligatory Electives): 5 (ECTS: 4)

3 Histories (Ancient/Byzantine/Modern Greek)* + 1 Philosophy/History of philosophy + 1 Teaching practice)

* The 3 Histories need not necessarily be each from a different period. Students may elect 2 or even 3 Histories from the same period, if they wish.

C) Courses ΥΕΤ (Division Obligatory Electives): 9* (ECTS: 4)

* ΑΕΦΕ 400, ΛΑΦΕ 400, ΝΕΦΙ 400 και ΝΕΦΕ 400 belong here too. These courses are not taught, but they are examined on the basis of reading lists made known to students upon their first enrolment in the Department.

D) Seminars: 4* (ECTS: 10)

* Students may enrol for more seminars, if they so wish. But the ECTS awarded to the additional seminars (i.e. to seminars beyond the obligatory 4) are 4 and not 10.

E) Courses ΕΛΕ (Free Electives): 5* (ECTS: 4)

* These courses can be taken from any Department of the University and one of them, the interuniversity course of the Program “Scientist/Scholar-Citizen” is strongly recommended. It should be clarified, however, that the ΕΛΕ courses need not necessarily be taken from outside the Department. Students, for example, may enrol for their ΕΛΕ in 5 Linguistic courses, or in 5 Theatre/Cinema courses, or in 3 ΝΕΦ/ΒΥΦ and 2 ΑΕΦ/ΛΑΦ courses, or make any other combination.

F) Courses Ξ.Γ. (Foreign Language and Terminology): 4* (ECTS: 2)

* The 4 Ξ.Γ. courses count as one for the Degree. That is to say, there is only one Ξ.Γ. grade in the Degree, and this grade is the average of the 4 Ξ.Γ. grades.

TOTAL NUMBER OF COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE: 55 (28 + 5 + 9 + 4 + 5 + 4)

TOTAL NUMBER OF TEACHING UNITS/HOURS: 165 (55Χ3)

TOTAL NUMBER OF REQUIRED ECTS: 240 (30 per semester, 30x8)

UNIVERSITY OF CRETE – FACULTY OF LETTERS

MODEL UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM OF STUDIES

FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

The numbers on the right of each column concern the ECTS awarded to each course

semester ►

1ο

2ο

3ο

4ο

number of courses

1

ΑΕΦ 010: 4

ΑΕΦ 020: 4

ΑΕΦ (2ΕΝ): 4

ΑΕΦ (3ΕΝ): 4

2

ΑΕΦ 100: 6

ΑΕΦ (1ΕΝ) : 4

ΛΑΦ (1ΕΝ): 4

ΛΑΦ (2ΕΝ): 4

3

ΛΑΦ 010: 4

ΛΑΦ 100: 4

ΝΕΦ (2ΕΝ): 4

ΒΥΦ (2ΕΝ): 4

4

ΝΕΦ 100: 6

ΛΑΦ 020: 4

ΝΕΘ : 4

ΝΕΦ (3ΕΝ): 4

5

ΝΕΦ (1ΕΝ): 4

ΒΥΦ 100: 4

ΓΛΩ (3): 4

ΓΛΩ (4): 4

6

ΓΛΩ 100 (1): 4

ΒΥΦ (1ΕΝ): 4

ΥΕΤ 1:* 4

ΥΕΤ 2: 4

7

ΓΛΩ 101 (2): 4

ΥΕΓ 1: 4

ΕΛΕ 1: 4

8

Ξ.Γ.: 2

Ξ.Γ.: 2

Ξ.Γ.: 2

Ξ.Γ.: 2

ECTS total

30

30

30

30

* For those belonging to the Byzantine and Modern Greek Division, course ΒΥΦΦ 101 is recommended.

semester ►

5ο

6ο

7ο

8ο

number of courses

1

ΑΕΦ (4ΕΝ): 4

ΑΕΦ (5ΕΝ): 4

ΝΕΦ (5ΕΝ): 4

ΥΕΤ 7: 4

2

ΒΥΦ (3ΕΝ): 4

ΝΕΦ (4ΕΝ): 4

ΥΕΤ 5:** 4

ΥΕΤ 8:♦ 4

3

ΥΕΤ 4:* 4

ΥΕΤ 6:*** 4

ΥΕΤ 9:♦ 4

4

ΥΕΤ 3: 4

5

ΥΕΓ 2: 4

ΥΕΓ 3: 4

ΥΕΓ 4: 4

ΥΕΓ 5: 4

6

ΕΛΕ 2: 4

ΕΛΕ 3: 4

ΕΛΕ 4: 4

ΕΛΕ 5: 4

7

ΣΕΜ: 10

ΣΕΜ: 10

ΣΕΜ: 10

ΣΕΜ: 10

ECTS total

30

30

30

30

* For those belonging to the Byzantine and Modern Greek Division, course ΝΕΦΙ 400 is recommended.

** For those belonging to the Byzantine and Modern Greek, course ΝΕΦΕ 400 is recommended.

*** For those belonging to the Classics Division, course ΛΑΦΕ 400 is recommended.

♦ For those belonging to the Classics Division, course ΑΕΦΕ 400 is recommended (which is double, i.e. it counts for 6 teaching units/hours and 8 ECTS).

  • Examination and assessment regulations

There are three examination periods: in January, after the end of Winter Semester; in June, after the end of Spring Semester; and in September, before the beginning of the Winter Semester, during which the students have the right to be examined in the courses of both the Winter and Spring Semesters.

The grading system in the university of Crete is based on a number from 1 to 10. The passing grade is 5.

Department of Philology (Greek System)

ECTS System

Fail

Good

Very Good

Excellent

0 - 4

5 - 6

7 - 8

9 - 10

5

6

7

8 - 9

10

F

E

D

C

B

A

Fail

Sufficient

Satisfactory

Good

Very Good

Excellent

Student's performance in each course can be assessed as follows:

-

By written and/or oral examination at the end of the semester

-

by evaluation of the quality of the term-paper and of class participation in the case of a seminar

-

through a combination of the performance in the examinations and in the written assignments during and at the end of the semester

  • ECTS departmental co-ordinator

Anastasios Nikolaidis

Professor of Classics

Address: Department of Philology, University of Crete Rethymnon, GR-74100.

Tel. Nr.: +30 28310 77261

Fax Nr.: +30 28310 77261 and 77304

E-mail: nikolaidis@phl.uoc.gr


DEPARTMENT OF PHILOLOGY

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 2010-2011

WINTER SEMESTER

DIVISION OF CLASSICAL STUDIES

Course title: Greek Reading and Prose Class (Part I)

Name of lecturer: A. Kavoulaki, D. Perodaskalakis, D. Spatharas, M. Tamiolaki, Ν. Kanavou

Course code: AEFF 010

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 1/ 2

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): The course aims a) at extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Ancient Greek language (Attic dialect), b) at improving their reading skills, and c) at developing their skill in Greek prose composition.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Reading and translation of ancient Greek prose texts; analysis of grammatical and syntactical structures; particular focus on and thorough practice in the following phenomena: a. the use of cases, and in particular genitive, dative and accusative; b. the use of moods in independent sentences; c. the use of tenses (of and outside of the indicative); d. the infinitive; e. the participle. Throughout the course particular emphasis will be also placed upon issues of accentuation, vowel and consonant change and declension of nouns and verbs.

Recommended reading: D. A. Russell, An Anthology of Greek Prose, Oxford 1991;

L. R. PALMER, The Greek Language, London 1980.

E. SCHWYZER, Griechische Grammatik I-IV, München 1939-71.

[I: Lautlehre, II: Syntax und syntaktische Stilistik (συμπλ. εκδ. A. DEBRUNNER), III: Register, IV: Stellenregister].

H.W. SMYTH, Greek Grammar (revised by G.M. MESSING), Cambridge Mass. 1956.

I. STAMATAKOS, A Historical Grammar of Ancient Greek (in Greek, Iστορική Γραμματική της Aρχαίας Eλληνικής), Athens 1949.

Teaching methods: Expository teaching and questioning; discourse; ad hoc exercises; written assignments.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Introduction to Classical Philology

Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: AEFF 100

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 1 / 2

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 6

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Introduction to the object, methods, history of Philology and familiarization with the tools of philological research.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: Object, methods and tools of philology. Elements of papyrology, paleography and textual criticism. Greek dialects, metre and scansion. Survey of the history of classical philology (esp. Greek) from the Hellenistic era to the middle of the 20th century. Open philological questions and modern approaches.

Recommended reading:

Irigoin, Jean, Tradition et Critique des Textes Grecs, Paris 1997.

Jäger, Gerhard, Einführung in die klassische Philologie, München 21980.

Maas, Paul, Textkritik, Leipzig 31957 (1927).

Mioni, Elpidio, Introduzione alla Paleografia Greca, Padova 1973.

Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther, Einleitung in die griechische Philologie, Stuttgart- Leipzig 1997.

Pfeiffer, Rudolf, History of Classical Scholarship, 2 vols., Oxford 1968/1976.

Reynolds, L.D. – Wilson, N.G., Scribes and Scholars. A Guide to the Transmission of Greek and Latin Literature, London 21975 (1967).

Turner, E. G., Greek Papyri. An Introduction, Oxford 1968.

Van Groningen, B. A., Traité d' histoire et de critique des textes grecs, Amsterdam 1963.

West, M. L., Textual Criticism and Editorial Technique, Stuttgart 1973.

Teaching methods: Lecture/Discussion

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek


Course title: Hesiod: Works and Days

Name of lecturer: A. Kavoulaki

Course code: AEFF 104

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate/ Advanced

Year of study: 2/ 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the language, structures and themes of the Hesiodic Works and Days. Understanding of the wider cultural context of traditional epic didactic poetry.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents:

This is a text-based subject. The primary aim is to read and discuss Hesiod’s Works and Days from many different angles (language, style, compositional techniques etc.), as well as to highlight the wider context of Archaic epic poetry.

Recommended reading:

M. L. West, Hesiod: Works and Days, Oxford 1978.

J. Strauss Clay, Hesiod’s cosmos, Cambridge 2003.

R. Lamberton, Hσίοδος: ο Ποιητής και το Έργο του, Aθήνα 2005.

N.Π. Mπεζαντάκος & X. Tσαγγάλης (επιμ.), Mουσάων αρχόμεθα: ο Hσίοδος και η αρχαϊκή επική ποίηση, Aθήνα 2006.

Teaching methods: Lecturing; questioning; discourse; audio-visual aids.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Bacchylides

Name of lecturer: Lucia Athanassaki

Course code: AEFF 119

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familarization with the language and the interpretive problems.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: The dithyrambs (c. 15, 16, 17, 18, 19)

Recommended reading:

Maehler, H. 2004. Bacchylides. A Selection. Cambridge.

Burnett, A. P. 1985. The Art of Bacchylides. Cambridge, MA

Teaching methods:

Assessment methods: Final written exam

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Sophocles Ajax

Name of lecturer: Perodaskalakis Dimitrios

Course code: ΑEFF 139

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The students are acquainted with the Sophoclean dramaturgy and the diction, the verse and all its elements and structure. The basic aims are a. to familiarise students with the way Sophocles presented the Homeric hero on stage, b. to teach students how to study the values of honour and shame in ancient Greek society, c. to have the students equipped with the theoretical knowledge needed for modern understanding and interpreting one of the earliest of Sophocles’ surviving plays.

Prerequisites:Ancient Greek Language (grammar and syntax)

Course contents:

Introduction to the greek drama

Sophocles : Life and Work

Metrical analysis

The Myth of Ajax

The Play in its Historical Background

The Text, its translation to modern greek and its commentary

Bibliography

Recommended reading:

Wiles, D. (2009), Το αρχαίο ελληνικό δράμα ως παράσταση, ΜΙΕΤ

Μeier, C. (1997), H Πολιτική Τέχνη της Αρχαίας Ελληνικής Τραγωδίας, Καρδαμίτσας

Teaching methods: Lectures.

Assessment methods: Written examination.

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Aristophanes Acharnians

Name of lecturer: Nikoletta Kanavou

Course code: AEFF 177

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): Acquaintance with the comic genre and Aristophanes. Competence in reading Greek Old Comedy in terms of language, but also in appreciating comic plots and characters, and the historical and political background.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Introduction to Old Comedy and to Aristophanes and his times. Reading and discussion of the comedy Acharnians : language, structure and plot ; the politics of peace and war ; characters and humour.

Recommended reading: Dover, K.J., 1972. Aristophanic comedy. London; MacDowell, D.M., 1995. Aristophanes and Athens: an introduction to the plays. Oxford; Zimmermann, B., 2006. Die griechische Komödie. Frankfurt am Mein; Olson, S.D., 2002. Aristophanes: Acharnians (ed. with introd. and comm.). Oxford; Sommerstein, A.H., 1980. Aristophanes: Acharnians. Warminster.

Teaching methods: weekly 3-hour lectures

Assessment methods: 3-hour written examination at the end of the semester

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Thucydides

Name of lecturer: Melina Tamiolaki

Course code: AEFF 187

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: any

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

The course aims at familiarizing the students with the language and basic themes of Thucydides’ history. Emphasis will be given on the aspects of the Athenian imperialism.

Prerequisites: Knowledge of ancient Greek

Course contents: Selected passages from Books 1,2,3,5,6.

Recommended reading: Thucydides in translation (Loeb)

Romilly, de J., Histoire et raison chez Thucydide, Paris 1967.

Rengakos, A.-Tsakmakis, A. (eds), Brill’s Companion to Thucydides, Leiden/Boston/Brill 2006.

Rood, T., Thucydides: Narrative and Explanation, Oxford 1998.

Teaching methods: The course is based on a close reading of Thucydides’ work. Passages will be translated in class and commented from a linguistic and narratological perspective. Information about the historical context of Thucydides’ history will also be provided.

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Modern Greek

Course title: Lysias. An Anthology

Name of lecturer: Kostas Apostolakis

Course code: AEFF 248

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study:2-4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course: The aim of this course is to familiarize students with important aspects of the Attic Oratory and to enable them assess the rhetorical art of Lysias.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Selected sections from Lysias’ speeches will be read, translated and commented upon. Emphasis will be given on style and special rhetorical qualities such as argumentation, ethopoiia and diabole.

Recommended reading: 1.Carey,C. (2007). Lysiae Orationes cum Fragmentis. Oxford. 2.Todd, St. (2007) A Commentary on Lysias Speeches 1-11. Oxford. 3.Todd,St.(2000) Lysias.Texas.4.Δ.Σπαθάρας, Λ.Τζαλλήλα (2003). Πειθώ. Δεκατρία Μελετήματα. Αθήνα.

Teaching methods: Lectures with class participation

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Minor Hellenistic Poets

Name of lecturer: K. Spanoudakis

Course code: AEFF 314

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): The course aims a) at introducing the students in Hellenistic aesthetics and poetry, b) at introducing the students in techniques for the study of fragmentary poetic texts, c) at developing their skill in Greek poetic idiom and conventions, and d) at acquiring an as complete as possible picture of the notions of genre in antiquity.

Prerequisites: AEFF 010/020/100

Course contents: Reading and translation of a wide range of fragmentary Hellenistic poets, and not so well known poets such as Aratus or Nicander; the epic language and its manipulation at Hellenistic times ; narrative techniques ; dialogue with the literary past, esp. Homer ; literature and contemporary politics.

Recommended reading: J. E. Powell, Collectanea Alexandrina, Oxford 1925; Η. Lloyd-Jones - P. J. Parsons, Supplementum Hellenisticum, Βerlin –New York 1983; N. Hopkinson, A Hellenistic Anthology, Cambridge 1987; J. Lightfoot, Hellenistic Collection, Loeb 2009; Φ. Μανακίδου – Κ. Σπανουδάκης (eds), Αλεξανδρινή Μούσα. Συνέχεια και Νεωτερισμός στην ελληνιστική ποίηση, Αthens 2008.

Teaching methods: Expository teaching and questioning.

Assessment methods: Oral presentation / Written essay.

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Plutarch, Moralia

Name of lecturer: Anastasios Nikolaidis

Course code: AEFF 335

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/ 4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization with the range and diversity of the Moralia corpus, the various problems this corpus poses (e.g., formation, authenticity, purpose etc.) and its relationship with the Lives.

Prerequisites: None

Course contents: After a brief introduction to Plutarch and a guided overview of the whole Moralia corpus, students will be expected to present orally and discuss in writing the tract (or tracts) they will select, or topics and motifs common to several treatises of the Moralia.

Recommended reading:

Russell, D. A., Plutarch London 1973

Ziegler, K., Plutarchos von Chaironeia, Stuttgart 21964 (1951) = RE 21.1, coll. 636-962

-----------------------------------------------------

For more recent bibliography on the Moralia, one can see ANRW II. 33.6 (1992), 4646-81, and Ploutarchos vols II-VI (2003-2009).

Teaching methods: Discussion of the contents of particular treatises or selected topics

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and written essay

Language of instruction: Modern Greek


Course title: Emotional persuasion: Aristotle, the emotions and the orators

Name of lecturer: Dimos Spatharas

Course code: AEFF 341

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

To familiarize students with Aristotle’s discussion of the emotions (pathe) in the Rhetoric and examine the ways in which forensic speakers appeal to their audiences’ emotions in order to enhance the persuasiveness of their speeches.

Prerequisites: AEFF 100, AEFF 010/020

Course contents:-

Recommended reading: Students will be provided with full bibliography during the first week.

Teaching methods: Introduction to the topic, paper presentations and discussion.

Assessment methods: Oral presentation and written paper.

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Latin Reading and Prose Class (Part I)

Name of lecturer: K. Apostolakis, K. Spanoudakis

Course code: LAFF 010

Type of course: Exercise

Level of course: Introductory

Year of study: 1/2

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences): The course aims a) at extending the students' knowledge of the morphology and syntax of the Latin language, b) at improving their reading skills.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Reading and translation of Latin prose texts; analysis of grammatical and syntactical structures; particular focus on and thorough practice in the following phenomena: a. the use of cases, and in particular genitive, dative and accusative; b. the use of moods in independent sentences; c. the use of tenses (of and outside of the indicative); d. the infinitive. Throughout the course particular emphasis will be also placed upon declension of nouns and verbs.

Recommended reading: H. Menge, Lehrbuch der lateinischen Syntax und Semantik, rev. by T. Burkard – M. Schauer, Darmstadt 2000; A. L. Sihler, New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford 1995; D. A. Russell. An Anthology of Latin Prose, Oxford 1990.

Teaching methods: Expository teaching and questioning; discourse; ad hoc exercises; written assignments.

Assessment methods: Written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Roman epic: The Evolution of the Hero Figure

Name of lecturer: Michael Paschalis

Course code: LAFF 113

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate / Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of students with the development of the hero figure in Lucretius, Virgil, Ovid, and Lucan

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: Reading and discussion of selected passages from the above-mentioned authors

Recommended reading: Peter Toohey, Reading Epic: An Introduction to Ancient Narratives, London /New York 1992; A.J. Boyle, Roman Epic, London / New York 1993; Michael von Albrecht, Roman Epic: An Interpretative Introduction, Leiden 1999; John Miles Foley, A Companion to Ancient Epic, Blackwell Publishing 2005

Teaching methods: Lecturing

Assessment methods: written examination

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: Cicero’s Philippics

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF 209

Type of course: Lecture

Level of course: Intermediate

Year of study: 2/3/4

Semester/trimester: Winter

Number of credits: 4

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

A comprehensive reading of selected passages from Cicero’s Philippics will enable students, on the one hand, to familiarize themselves with Roman oratorical invective and, on the other, to have a better understanding of the historical and ideological context in the late Roman Republic.

Prerequisites: none

Course contents: This text-based subject aims at reading and discussing selected passages from Cicero’s Phillipics from various perspectives (language, style, compositional technique), and at highlighting both the wider context of Roman Rhetoric and Cicero’s individual contribution.

Recommended reading:

T. Stevenson, M. Wilson (eds.), Cicero’s Philippics: history, rhetoric, ideology, Auckland, N.Z. 2008.

W. Dominik, J. Hall (eds.), A Companion to Roman Rhetoric, Malden, MA 2007.

Teaching methods: Lectures, class participation and discussion

Assessment methods: Written exams

Language of instruction: Greek

Course title: The riddle in Latin literature

Name of lecturer: Stelios Panayotakis

Course code: LAFF 363

Type of course: Seminar

Level of course: Advanced

Year of study: 3/4

Semester: Winter

Number of credits: 10

Objectives of the course (preferably expressed in terms of learning outcomes and competences):

Familiarization of the students with the literary riddle and its function in various genres in Latin literature, including epic, epigram and the novel. Acquisition of special research skills and familiarization of students with special research methodology.

Prerequisites: LAFF 100, LAFF 010 and 020

Course contents: The seminar aims at discussing the style and the function of riddles attested in Latin literature either individually or in the form of a collection (such as the riddles of Symphosius in the Anthologia Latina).

Recommended reading:

K. Ohlert, Raetsel und Raetselspiele der alten Griechen, Berlin 1912 (repr. Hildesheim-New York 1979).

P. Struck, Birth of the Symbol: ancient readers at the limits of their texts, Princeton 2004.

Teaching methods: Basic introduction given by the instructor and student’s participation and presentation of selected topics.

Assessment methods: class participation, oral presentation and written essay.

Language of instruction: Greek



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