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IP0098 PRODUCTIVITY MANAGEMENT

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

UNIT I

INTRODUCTION

Productivity concepts - Macro and Micro factors of productivity, Productivity benefit model, productivity cycle. Productivity measurement at International, National and Organisational level, Total productivity models.

UNIT II

PRODUCTIVITY MODELS

Productivity management in manufacturing and service sector. Productivity evaluation models, Productivity improvement models and techniques.

UNIT III

ORGANISATIONAL TRANSFORMATION

Principles of organisational transformation and re-engineering, fundamentals of process reengineering, preparing the workforce for transformation and reengineering,

methodology, guidelines, DSMCQ and PMP model.

UNIT IV

RE-ENGINEERING PROCESS IMPROVEMENT MODELS

PMI models, Edosomwan model, Moen and Nolan strategy for process improvement, LMICIP model, NPRDC model. Analytical and process tools and techniques - Information and communication technology - Enabling role of IT,

UNIT V

RE-ENGINEERING TOOLS AND IMPLEMENTATION

RE-opportunities, process redesign - cases. Software methods in BPR - specification of BP, case study - Order, processing, user interfaces, maintainability and reusability.

UNIT VI

PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUES

Productivity management cycle, problems and prospects in Indian Industries; Application of conventional Industrial Engineering techniques for productivity improvement. Incentive Plans, Job Evaluation. Business Process Reengineering. Quality Management- Evolution; Contributions of Juran, Deming, and Crossby; Quality control tools and techniques, Six Sigma, TQM, ISO Certification.

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

TEXT BOOKS

1. Sumanth, D.J., "; Productivity engineering and management ";, TMH, New Delhi, 1990.

2. Edosomwan, J.A., "; Organisational transformation and process re-engineering ";,

British Library cataloging in pub. data, 1996.

REFERANCE BOOKS

1. Rastogi, P.N. "; Re-Engineering and Re-inventing the enterprise ";, Wheeler pub. New Delhi, 1995.

2. Premvrat, Sardana, G.D. and Sahay, B.S, "; Productivity Management - A systems approach ";,Narosa Pub. New Delhi, 1998.

IP0108 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit 1

Human Resources Management - Introduction and Importance - Evolution - Difference between Personnel Management and HRM - Role of HR Manager - Structure of HR Department - Duties and responsibilities of HR Manager

Unit 2

HRD Systems - Evolution - Goals - Elements and their interrelationship - HR Strategies - HR Strategies and Organizational Strategies

Unit 3

Manpower Planning - Objectives - Estimating manpower requirement - Recruitment and selection process - Main resources of recruitment - Assessment Devices - Retention of manpower - Succession Planning

Merit Rating - Promotions - Transfers - Job Description - Job Evaluation - Job Enlargement - Job Enrichment - Job Rotation

Unit 4

Training and Development - Training Process and Methodology - Need and objectives - Training Procedure - Methods of Training - Tools and Aids - Evaluation of Training Programmes

Unit 5

Performance Appraisal Management System - Definition, Ethics and Concepts of Performance Management - Different methods of Performance Appraisal - Rating Errors

Unit 6

Retirement / Separation - Kinds of Retirement - Resignation, Discharge, Dismissal, Suspension, Retirement, Layoff, Voluntary Retirement / Separation Schemes, Golden handshake. Role of HRD in developing Industrial Relations - Concept - Industrial Democracy - Industrial Peace

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

TEXT BOOK

  1. Managing Human Resources , R.S. Diwedi

2. Human Resource Management - Garry Dessler

REFERENCE BOOKS:


1. Personnel Management - C. B. Mamoria
2. Human Resource Management - B. P. Michael
3. Human Resource Management - De. P. C. Pardeshi
4. Human Resources Management - Mirza & Saiyadin
5. Managing Human Resources - Arun Monappa

IP0118 Materials & Operations Management

Prerequisites: Not required

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit I: Operations Management an integrated approach

Operations Management an integrated approach Concurrent Engineering, Product Development Life Cycle, Types of production systems, Plant location – analysis, Plant Layout – Types & Techniques

Unit II: Production Planning & Control

Concept of Production planning, Production scheduling techniques, Line Balancing technique, Intro to PERT/CPM, Maintenance planning, Concept of TPM, 5S, OEE

Unit III: Inventory Control

Inventory classification & costs, Selective Inventory Control, Economic order quantity assumptions & model, Replenishment Systems

Unit IV: Purchase procedures

Purchase procedures, Vendor Development & rating, Import purchasing procedure, Legal issues

Unit V: Storage & Warehousing

Stores & warehousing, methods of stock taking, scrape removal, prerequisites of automated warehousing, Automated Warehousing, Concept of MRP, Introduction to ERP

Unit VI: Recent trends in manufacturing

World Class manufacturing, Lean manufacturing, agile manufacturing, Green production, recent trends in manufacturing

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

Text Book

  1. Production & Operations Management – S.N. Chary, McGraw Hill Publications,

Reference Books

  1. Operations Management, 5th Ed. - Krajewski

  2. Production & Operations Management – Chase, Pearson Publications

  3. Production & Operations Management – Panneerselvam, McGraw Hill Publications,

  4. Material Management by Dobler Burt

  5. Inventory management, Silver and Peterson, John Willey and sons

IP0128 Management Information System

Prerequisites: Not required

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit I

Introduction: Definitions, objective, structure, operating elements, MIS structure based on management activity, organizational function

Unit II

System concepts: Definition, Types of systems, system decomposition, system entropy, system stress, methods of simplification, design concepts

Unit III

SDLC approach: System development life cycle approach, system requirement specifications, entity relationship diagram, data dictionary, report generation, database administration

Unit IV

Object Oriented Analysis and Design: Introduction, concepts of objects, class, encapsulation, various steps of OOA, methods like Booch, Rambaugh etc. Domain Analysis, Human computer Interface, Introduction to System Testing

Unit V

Decision Support System: Introduction to decision support system, experts systems, hardware and software acquisition, legal Issues

Unit VI

Information Management and society: computer security, privacy, manual versus electronic information, back up protection, user interfaces, encryption, responsibility and ethics

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

Text Book

1. Software Engineering by Joshi S.D.

Reference Books:

1. Management Information System by Jawadekar W.S.

2. Management Information System by Davis G.B.

3. Management Information System by Obrien J.C.

4. Management Information System by Mc Cory Keith R

5. Software Engineering by Pressman R.S.

6. Software Engineering by Prasad R. S.

IP0138 Human Factors Engineering

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit 1

Introduction: Historical background. Definition, importance.

Unit 2

Human Machine Systems – interfaces, Ergonomics at Work Place.

Unit 3

Anthropometric Principles. Anthropometric Data – sample, equipment, analysis.

Unit 4

Applied Anthropometry and Work Space Design & Seating. Product design.

Unit 5

Work related musculoskeletal disorders, visual environment, thermal environment, auditory environment, Vibrations.

Unit 6

Legal and Safety Aspects.

Time: 7hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ILO, Introduction to Work study

  2. Curie R. M. & Faraday, Work study

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. M. S. Sanders and Ernest J. McCormick, McGraw Hill Inc., Human Factors Engineering and Design.

2.E. Grad jean, Fitting Task to the Man.

  1. The Factories Act, 1948.

IP0038 Network and Project Management

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit 1

Introduction to Networks, deriving networks on the basis of graph theory, Maximal flow minimal cut theorem, applications of networks in operations research.

Unit 2

Various models in OR which can be solved using networks techniques.

Unit 3

Multi-terminal Maximal flows, Multi-terminal shortest paths. Multi commodity flows. Synthesis of networks. The general minimal cost flow problem, Minimal cost calculation, Network simplex Method.

Unit 4

Matching problems and the bottleneck assignment problem. Application to vehicle routing problems.

Unit 5

Determination of size and schedules for transportation fleets.

Synchronization of signalized interactions, Project Scheduling with resource constraints,

Unit 6

Network flows in the economy, Input-output analysis.

 

Time: 7 hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

Text Books

  1. Philips, Ravindran; Network theory,

  2. R. T. Rockafellar (1984), Network Flows and Monotropic Optimization, Wiley.

Reference Books

  1. R. K. Ahuja, T. L. Magnanti, and J. B. Orlin (1993), Network Flows: Theory Algorithms and Applications, Prentice Hall.

  2. M. S. Bazaraa, J. J. Jarvis, and H. D. Sherali (1990), Linear Programming and Network Flows, 2nd Edition, John Wiley, New York.

  3. L. R. Ford, and D. R. Fulkerson (1962), Flow in Networks, Princeton University Press, Princeton.

IP0048 QUALITY AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives: 1. To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  1. Develop conceptual framework of the course

  2. Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  3. Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

UNIT 1. CONCEPTS OF QUALITY

DEMING,ISHIKWA AND JURAN’S approach towards quality.quality of design,conformance and performance,quality policy,quality costs,TQM,QFD,six sigma.

UNIT 2.STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES IN QUALITY CONTROL

Variation in processes-Factors-Process capability-Analysis of process capability-control-charts-variables- Attributes-Establishing and interpreting control charts-X,R, ,chart for variables-defects-P chart and U chart- Control charts for Defectives and quality rating.

Design of experiment,Taguchi philosophy.

UNIT 3. ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING

Lot-by-lot sampling-types-probability of acceptance in single, double, multiple sampling techniques-O.C.curvesproducer's Risk and consumer's Risk AQL, LTPD, AOQL concepts-standard sampling plans for AQL and LTPD-uses of standard sampling plans.

UNIT 4. RELIABILITY

Importance of reliability, performance cost and reliability, quality and safety, system configuration with examples, stochastic processes, bathtub concept, MTBF, MTTR, hazard rate, failure rate, probability and sampling, cumulative probability distribution function, data and distributions. 

UNIT 5. RELIABILITY-SYSTEM APPROACH

System reliability-series and parallel systems-system reliability in terms of probability of failure-MTBF-Acceptance sampling based on reliability test-OC curves Active and Passive Redundancy, redundancy allocation and limitations, Evaluation of overall system reliability, Conditional probability, Matrix methods, set theory analysis of system reliability. 

.

UNIT 6. .

Reliability and safety factors, Repetitive loading, Preventive maintenance, Testing and repair, reliability centered maintenance, system availability and maintainability. Life testing-objective-classification-failure characteristics-failure data analysis-mean time to failure .

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

TEXT BOOKS:

1. Besterfield D.H., "; Quality Control ";, Prentice Hall (1993) (Revised Edn).

2. Sharma S.C., "; Inspection Quality Control and Reliability ";, Khanna Publishers,

New Delhi (1998).

 

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. John Bank, "; The Essence of Total Quality Management ";, Prentice Hall of India (p) Ltd., New Delhi (1995).

2. Danny Samson, "; Manufacuturing & Operations strategy ";, Prentice Hall, New York (1991).

3. Ganapathy.K, Subramaniam. B., Narayana. "; V-Quality Circle concepts and implementation - QCFI ";,

Secundrabad 919940.

4. Tapan P. Bagchi ISO9000, "; concepts, methods and implementataion ";, Wheeler Publisher,

Allahabad (1994).

5. Connor, P.D.T.O., "; Practical Reliability Engineering ";, John Wiley (1993).

6. Green A.E., and Bourne A.J. "; Reliability, Technology ";, Wiley Interscience, 1991.

7. Kollavic "; Creating Quality ";, McGraw Hill, New York, 1995.

8. S. K. Basu, B. Bhadury, “Terotechnology-Reliability Engineering and maintenance”, Asian books Pvt. Ltd (2003), ISBN 81-86299-40-6.

  1. Sheldon M. Ross, “Stochastic Processes”, John Wiley and Sons.

IP5038 Network & Project ManagementLab

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To develop skills in the subject

  • Verify the principles of the course

  • Application of the theory

Assignments On following

  1. Project Identification

  2. Project Budgeting

  3. Project costing

  4. Project appraisal

  5. Project scheduling

  6. Project balance sheet

Outcomes: The student will

  • acquire the skills

  • improve ability to solve industrial problems on the subject

  • understand the technical writing of experiments.

TEXT BOOKS:

1. Operations Management for Competitive Advantage - Chase

2. Making Common Sense Common Practice – Mooref

REFERENCE BOOKS

1 Managing Technology & Innovation for Competitive Advantage - Narayanan

2 Just In Time Manufacturing - M.G.Korgaonkar

3. World Class Manufacturing - B.S.Sahay

4. World Class Manufacturing - Schonberger

IP5048 QUALITY & RELIABILITY ENGINEERINGLAB

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To develop skills in the subject

  • Verify the principles of the course

  • Application of the theory

List of Practicals

    1. TQM

    2. STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES IN QUALITY CONTROL

    3. Acceptance Sampling

    4. MTBF

    5. Acceptance sampling based on reliability

    6. Failure data analysis

Outcomes: The student will

  • acquire the skills

  • improve ability to solve industrial problems on the subject

  • understand the technical writing of experiments.

TEXT BOOKS:

1. Besterfield D.H., "; Quality Control ";, Prentice Hall (1993) (Revised Edn).

2. Sharma S.C., "; Inspection Quality Control and Reliability ";, Khanna Publishers,

New Delhi (1998).

 

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. John Bank, "; The Essence of Total Quality Management ";, Prentice Hall of India (p) Ltd., New Delhi (1995).

2. Danny Samson, "; Manufacuturing & Operations strategy ";, Prentice Hall, New York (1991).

3. Ganapathy.K, Subramaniam. B., Narayana. "; V-Quality Circle concepts and implementation - QCFI ";,

Secundrabad 919940.

4. Tapan P. Bagchi ISO9000, "; concepts, methods and implementataion ";, Wheeler Publisher,

Allahabad (1994).

5. Connor, P.D.T.O., "; Practical Reliability Engineering ";, John Wiley (1993).

6. Green A.E., and Bourne A.J. "; Reliability, Technology ";, Wiley Interscience, 1991.

7. Kollavic "; Creating Quality ";, McGraw Hill, New York, 1995.

8. S. K. Basu, B. Bhadury, “Terotechnology-Reliability Engineering and maintenance”, Asian books Pvt. Ltd (2003), ISBN 81-86299-40-6.

  1. Sheldon M. Ross, “Stochastic Processes”, John Wiley and Sons.

IP5068 Seminar-II

Objective: To learn about literature survey of the subject of his own interest

a) The objective of Seminar is to test the student on his/her ability for self-study and his/her ability to communicate - Written and oral.

b) Seminar will be in the form of a report submitted by the student:

It will be -

1. Done by a student individually, on topic of his/her choice based on literature survey /a case study wherever applicable / possible, and approved by the staff- in- charge,

2. A report with 15-20 pages of A-4 size paper, 1.5 spaced typed material, and appropriately bound.

 c) The Oral examination will be based on the report submitted and (orally) presented.

1. Paper: The Project report should be types. printed on white paper of A-4 size.

2. Typing: The typing shall be with single spacing and on one side of the paper.

3. Binding: The Industrial Inplant Report should be submitted with front and back cover in black hand bound, with golden embossing.

4. Margins: Left - 1.25";, Right - 1";. Top and Bottom 1 ";

5. Sequence of Pages:

1. Title page

2. Certificate form Institute

3. Completion Certificate form Industry, if sponsored.

4. Acknowledgement

5. Abstract

6. Index

7. Nomenclature and Symbols

8. Actual Content

9. Conclusion

10. References.

6. Front cover: The front cover shall have the following details in block capitals

i. Title at the top.

ii. Name of the candidate in the centre, and

iii. Name of the Institute, Name of Industry, if sponsored and the year of submission on separate lines, at the bottom.

7. Blank sheets: No blank sheets be left any where in the report. 8. Project Completion Certificate:

The approval sheet follow the title sheet and shall be as shown with proper spacing.

 

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that Mr. /Ms …………………………………………………

Has carried out a Dissertation entitled, (Name)

 

…………………………………………during the course of his

(Name of Project)

training at………………………………………………..in

(Name of Industry)

partial fulfillment of the requirement of the M.E. Industrial Course of Vishwakarma Institute of Technology, Pune

at ……………………………during the academic Year ………………

(Name of Industry)

 

 

Date: (Guide)

Place:

 

 

 

 

(Examiner) (Head of Department)

 

Outcome:

  1. Improved presentations and communication skills

  2. To understand the subject of his own interest

  3. To understand the technical report writing

IP0138 Human Factors Engineering

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit 1

Introduction: Historical background. Definition, importance.

Unit 2

Human Machine Systems – interfaces, Ergonomics at Work Place.

Unit 3

Anthropometric Principles. Anthropometric Data – sample, equipment, analysis.

Unit 4

Applied Anthropometry and Work Space Design & Seating. Product design.

Unit 5

Work related musculoskeletal disorders, visual environment, thermal environment, auditory environment, Vibrations.

Unit 6

Legal and Safety Aspects.

Time: 7hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. ILO, Introduction to Work study

  2. Curie R. M. & Faraday, Work study

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. M. S. Sanders and Ernest J. McCormick, McGraw Hill Inc., Human Factors Engineering and Design.

2.E. Grad jean, Fitting Task to the Man.

  1. The Factories Act, 1948.

IP0148 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT & COSTING

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Financial Management

UNIT 1:

Introduction: Finance Function – scope, Goals of Financial Management. Sources of Financial Information. Corporate Planning & Financial Management: Objectives & goals, Goals of Top Management, Capital Expenditure & Corporate Planning.

Tools of Financial Management:

  1. Funds Flow Analysis: Concept, Objectives. Technique of Funds Flow Statement.

  2. Ratio Analysis: Classification of Ratios: Structural group, Turnover group, Standards for Comparison; limitations of Ratio Analysis, Return on Investment an Integral Ratio.

  3. Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis: Mechanics of break-even Chart. Profit planning & break-even Analysis. Margin of Safety.

  4. Operating & Financial Leverage: Effects of Leverages on Variability of Earnings, Leverage & Financial Management.

UNIT 2:

Financial Forecasting & Cash Management:

  1. Financial Forecasting: Tools- pro-forma financial statement, Cash Budget, Reconciliation of pro forma financial statement & cash budget.

  2. Managing Cash: inflow & outflow. Investing surplus cash.

  3. Management of Short Term Finance: Working Capital Management, Accounts Receivable, Inventory, Banks & Working Capital.

  4. Management of Term Loans: Raising the Loans, Term Loan Appraisal, Security, Effective Negotiations.

UNIT 3:

Allocation of Resources: Capital Budgeting-Control of Capital Expenditure, Evaluation Process-Payback approach, Accounting of Rate of Return, Present Value Method Vs Internal Rate of Return.

Cost of Capital: Relevant Cost. Measurement of Cost of Capital, Cost of Debt, Preference Shares, Equity Shares. Internal Financing: Dividends, Cost of Retained Earnings Concept.

Costing:

UNIT 4:

  1. Significance of Costing for Engineers. Limitations of Financial Accounting. Corporate Objectives - Profitability and other objectives. Product, Services and Market Mix. Elements of Cost – Material, Labour, Expenses. Overheads. Direct and Indirect Cost, Fixed and Variable cost, other classifications.

  2. Cost Allocation: Cost Accumulation and Allocation. Allocation of cost of Service Departments- Reciprocal Method, allotting cost from one department to other.

UNIT 5:

  1. Depreciation as a cost – various methods of calculation. Joint and by-product cost – Joint cost problems. Treatment of by-product costs. Decision making with joint products.

  2. Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis: Assumptions, determination of break-even point, CVP under multiple products. Marginal Costing: Use of Marginal costing in decision-making.

UNIT 6:

  1. Activity Based Costing: Concept. Cost Drivers. Applications. Process Costing: Concept. Transfer Cost. Concept of by-products, scrap, waste, losses.

  2. Cost Control as a Management Tool: Standard Costing: concept. Development and use of Standard Costing. Budget and Budgetary Control, Variance Analysis. Target Costing.

Time: 7hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Henry M. Steiner,

  2. C. B. Gupta, Fundamentals of Business, Sultan Chand & Co.

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. P. A. Samualson, Economics, McGraw Hill International.

2.K. K. Dewett, Modern Economic Theory, Sultan Chand & Co.

3. S. C. Shukla, T. S. Grewal; Advanced Accounts, S. Chand and Sons, New Delhi 110 055.

4. Bhar B. K.; Costing.

5 Prasad N. K.; Cost Accounting, Book Syndicate Pvt. Ltd., Calcutta 700 009.

  1. Colin Drury; Management and Cost Accounting, English Language Book Society, Chapman & Hall, London EC 4 P 4EE. [ISBN 0 412 34120 4]

IP0158 Numerical Methods & Computer Programming

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

UNIT 1

Revision of C or C+ + syntax.

Numerical Solution of algebric and transcendental equations by half interval search method, false position method, Newton Raphson method and interative methods.

UNIT 2

Numerical Solution of Linear Simultaneous equations by Gauss elimination method, Gauss-Jordan Method, Gauss-Siedel method. Matrix inverse.

UNIT 3

Interpolation : Lagrange's formula. Newton's forward difference method, backward difference method and divided difference method. Inverse interpolation.

UNIT 4

Curve fitting : Least square criterion-1st and 2nd order.

Numerical integration by Trapezoidal rule, Simpson's. l/3rd and 3/8th rules; Weddle's rule and two point Gauss quadrature. Double integration.

UNIT 5

Numerical solution of differential equations : Taylor's series method, Euler method, modified Euler method, Predictor corrector method, Runge-Kutta 2nd and 4th order methods. Simultaneous differential equation and 2nd order differential equation.,

Errors and approximations : Types off errors, absolute error, relative error, algorithmic errors, truncation error, roundoff error. Error propagation.

UNIT 6

Numerical solution of partial differential equations: Finite difference methods. Elliptic equation - Laplace equation. Poison's equation. One and two dimensional Heat equations. Wave equations.

 

Time: 7 hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research oriented work based on the course content

Text Books

  1. Numerical methods for Engineers by S. C. Chapra and R. P. Canale Published by McGraw Hill.

  2. Numerical methods by Balaguruswamy, Published By Tata Mcgraw Hill

Reference Books

  1. V. Rajaraman, Computer Oriented Numerical Methods - Prentice Hall Publication.

  2. S. S. Sastry, Introductory methods of Numerical Analysis - Prentice Hall Publication.

  3. Jain, Ayengar, Jain : Numerical Methods for Scientific and Engineering Computations - Wiley Eastern Publication.

  4. Dr. B. S. Grewal : Numerical Methods in Engineering and Science.

  5. Numerical methods by S. Balachandra Rao and C. K. Shantha, Published by University Press, Hyderabad

IP0168 Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit 1:

Logistics - Concept and significance - Distribution Strategies - Customer Service policies and Integrated Logistics Management

Unit 2:

Transportation Alternatives - Railway, Road, Air, Waterways, Pipe Lines, Animals and Animal driven vehicles - Economics of transportation - Applications of Quantitative Techniques - Transportation Models

Unit 3:

Distribution Network Planning system - Location - Number and size of facilities - Stocking Policies - Storage and handling capacities - Introduction to State and Central Warehouse Acts

Unit 4:

Packaging - Principles, functions and types - Containerization - Concepts - Infrastructure - Customs Issues - Service Utilization Modes - Rail, Sea and Road

Role of Freight and Insurance in Logistics

Unit 5:

Concept of Supply Chain Management and its strategic role in the organization - Intra and Inter Organization Supply Chain

Unit 6:

Designing of efficient supply chain policies - Bottlenecks and remedies

Integration of supply chain with corporate strategy - Cost efficiency across supply chain - Impact on Customer Service

Role of computer and IT in supply chain

Time: 7 hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

Text Books

1. Purchasing & Supply Management - Dobler and Burt

2. Strategic Logistics Management – Lambert

Reference Books

1. Logistical Management - The Integrated Supply Chain Process – Bowersox

2. Materials & Logistics Management - L.C.Jhamb

3. Logistics & Supply Chain Management – Christopher

4. Supply Chain Management - Sunil Chopra

5. Logistics & Supply Chain Management – Raghuram

6. Supply Chain Management for 21st Century - Sahay

IP0178 INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL LAWS

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

UNIT 1

The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947. Works Committee, Conciliation Officers, Board of Conciliation, Court of Inquiry, Labour Courts, Tribunals, National Tribunal. Procedure, power and duties of the authorities. Strikes and lockouts, layoffs and retrenchment, closure. Unfair labour practices, Penalties.

UNIT 2

The Trade Union Act 1926. Formation of Trade Unions, Collective bargaining capacity. The Industrial Employment [Standing Orders] Act, 1946 (20 of 1946). Draft Standing Orders, conditions for certification of Standing Orders, Appeals, Register of Standing Orders. Temporary application of model standing orders.

UNIT 3

The Factories Act, 1948. Health, Safety, Provisions relating to Hazardous Processes, Welfare, Working Hours of Adults, Employment of young persons, Annual Leave with wages.

UNIT 4

The Employees’ Provident Fund & Miscellaneous Provisions Act, 1952 (10 of 1952). Employee’s Provident Fund Schemes, Central Board, Employee’s Pension Scheme, Employee’s Deposit Linked Insurance Scheme, Contributions.

UNIT 5

The Competition Act, 2000: Objective, Competition Commission, Dominant Position, Anti-Competitive Agreements, Relevant Markets, Cartel, Abuse of Dominant Position, Regulation of Combinations.

UNIT 6

The Sale of Goods Act, 1930 (3 of 1930). Contract of Sale, Formalities of Contract, Subject Matter of Contract, the Price, Conditions and Warranties. Transfer of Property as between seller and buyer, Transfer of title.

Time: 7hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

TEXT BOOKS:

  1. Pramod Verma, Management of Industrial Relations, Oxford and IBH Publishing Co., Mumbai.

  2. C. Jagamohandas and Co., Mumbai – publications of Acts with short notes.

REFERENCE BOOKS:

1. Taxman, Commercial Laws.

2. Taxman, Labour Laws.

  1. Chawla R C & Garg K C: Text Book Of Industrial Law. (4) Kalyani Pub. New Delhi.

  2. Malik P.L.: Handbook of Labour and Industrial Law. Lucknow. Eastern Book Co.,

  3. Joshi B D: Mercantile Law and Industrial Law. Pune. Narendra Prakashan,

  4. Factories Act 1948

  5. Labour Law Agency: Factories Act 1948. Mumbai. Labour Law Agency,

  6. Srivastava's K D: Factories Act 1948. (5) Lucknow. Eastern Book Company,

  7. Industrial Disputes Act 1947. Law Publishers Pvt Ltd

  8. Chaudhary A N: Industrial Disputes Act No 14 Of 1947. New Delhi. Ashoka Law House,

  9. Industrial Disputes Act1947with Ind.des.bom. Rules. Labour Law Agency Pune

  10. Sale Of Goods Act 1930 Bare Act 2001. Law Publishers Pvt Ltd Allahab

  11. Professional Book Publishers: Professional's Sale Of Goods Act, 1930. New Delhi. Professional Book Publishers,

  12. Relevant Acts.

IP0188 Environmental Engineering & Energy Management

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit 1 : Introduction:

Energy Scenario – global, sub continental and Indian, Energy economy relation, Future energy demand and supply scenario, Integrated energy planning with particular reference to Industrial Sector in India, Captive power units and others – demand v/s supply. The Prevention and Control of Pollution Act, 1974, The Energy Conservation Act, 2001, The Environmental Protection Act, 1986.

Unit 2 : Types of Energy

Physical Aspects of Energy: Classification of energy – Hydel, Thermal, Nuclear, Wind, & from Waste Products. Efficiency and effectiveness of energy utilization in Industry. Energy and energy analysis.

Unit 3 : Legal Provisions:

Legal provisions in Energy Management and its impact: The Energy Conservation Act, 2003, The Electricity Act, 2003. National Electricity Policy. Rural Electrification.

Unit 4 : Demand Side Management

Energy Demand Management: Energy utilization, Instrumentation and data analysis, Financial aspects of energy management, Energy management as a separate function and its place in plant management hierarchy.

Energy Demand Management : Scope , Methodology, modes of energy savings, Plant energy and utility systems, Efficient energy management – Nine steps – i) Identification ii) Investigation iii) Quantification iv) Decisions v) Presentation vi) Implementation vii) follow-up viii) Set Targets ix) Re-examine;

Unit 5 : Energy Audit and Energy Saving

Energy Audit: Audit and analysis, Energy load measurements, System evaluation and simulation, Energy saving techniques and guidelines: Administrative control, Proper Measurement and monitoring system, Process control, proper planning & scheduling, Increasing capacity utilization, Improving equipment control, waste heat recovery, Change of energy source. Up gradation of Technology. Change of product specifications, Use of High efficiency equipment, Design modification for better efficiency, Improved periodic maintenance; Energy conservation with particular reference to waste heat recovery in different industries; Improvement in combustion system and use of Industrial waste; Co-generation and rational operation of production processes. Case study analysis. Provisions under the Electricity Act, functions of Bureau of Energy Efficiency

Unit 6 : Environment Protection Act, 1986

Environment, Environmental Pollutants, Hazardous Substances, Powers of Central Government, Prevention. Control and Abetment of Environmental Pollution, Offences and Penalties.

Time: 7hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • Energy is becoming more and more important day by day due to the ever increasing costs, and hence knowledge about energy management is a must for any engineer.

  • This subject will help students in undertaking final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • This knowledge of the course can also be used in solving real life problems

Text Books

  1. Energy Conservation Act 2001(Act No 52 OF 2001) with short comments, Alahabad Law Publishers (India) Pvt Ltd, 2003.

  2. Electricity Act 2003(Act No 36 of 2003) Bare Act with short comments. Professional Book Publishers, New Delhi, 2003.

Reference Books

  1. Paul W., O’callaghan; Energy Management.

  2. Wayne C. Turner; Energy Management Handbook.

  3. B.L. Capheart, W.J. Kennedy; Guide to Energy Management.

  4. Reay; Industrial Energy Conservation.

  5. CII Reports on Indian Energy Management.

  6. Murphy W R & Mckay G: Energy Management. Butterworth Heinemann Oxford, 1982.

IP0198 World Class Manufacturing

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Aim is to provide insight of the subject

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Course Contents

  1. Models of world class manufacturing

  • Hall’s framework of value –added engineering

  • Schonberger,s framework of world class manufacturing

  • Various models of world class manufacturing

  • JIPM TPM Award, EFQM Award, RBNQA Award

  1. Lean Manufacturing & Services

    • Lean Mfg tools

    • Value Stream Mapping

    • Implementation Roadmap.

  2. Material processing and handling tools :

      • Set-up Time Reduction: SMED Methodology for Set-up reduction, Set-up Reduction Projects.

      • Design of JIT: Flexible Manufacturing Systems (FMS), Concurrent Engineering, Design for Manufacturability and Assembly (DFMA), Collaborative Product Commerce (CPC)

      • Group Technology, Focused Factories and Cellular Manufacturing: Work cell concepts and applications, Work cell design, work cell staffing and equipment issues

  1. Total Productive Maintenance:

  • Outline of TPM

  • Production Efficiency

  • Improvement program for Zero failures

  • Implementation of Jishu-Hozen activities

  • Planned Maintenance

  • Initial-Phase Management

  • Quality Maintenance

  • Operation & Maintenance skill Development

  • Implementation of TPM in the Administrative & Indirect Departments

  • Zero Accidents & Zero Pollution

  • Small-Group activities of TPM

  1. Business Process Reengineering

  • BPR Concepts, Practices & Philosophy.

  • Key features and guiding principles of Reengineering,

  • Kinds of changes that occur in reengineering,

  • Changes required on Behavioral Side in a BPR Project

  • Concepts of Business and Core Processes in BPR.

  • Different Management Audit to initiate BPR Projects.

  • Critical Analysis of Business Processes through Strategic Relevance Grid and Critical Success Factors Method considering Core and Supporting Processes.

  • Formulating Future desired. State of Business by Understanding Relationship between Vision, Mission, Policies and Goals of Organization.

  1. World Class services in Banking, Financial services, IT, ITES, Logistics, Retail, Hospitals, Travel & Tourism, Power sector, Public utilities. (Guest Lectures, Internet research, Library, etc.)

Time: 7hrs per unit

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

  • Apply the knowledge of the course in solving real life problems

Text book:

  1. World Class Manufacturing -A strategic perspective by B.S. Sahay, Saxena, Macmillan, India

  2. Hammer M. and Champy J. Re-engineering the corporation - Harper Collins.

  3. TPM – New Implementation Program in Fabrication & Assembly Industries By Kunio Shirose Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance

Reference Books:

  1. Cause and Effect Lean – The essentials of Lean Manufacturing by John Bicheno

  2. Maintainability Engineering – Blanchard & Verma

  3. World Class Manufacturing- Case Book-R J Schonberger (Free press)

  4. World Class Manufacturing – Richard Schonberger

  5. Introduction to TPM: Total Productive Maintenance by Nakajima Seiichi

  6. Total Productive Maintenance by Terry Wireman (Industrial Press)

  7. Management Of Industrial Maintenance By A. Kelley, M.J. Harris (Newness Butterworths)

  8. Complete Handbook of Maintenance Management By J.E. Heintzelman (Prentice Hall)

  9. TPM material/ books published by JIPM (Japanese Institute of Plant Maintenance)

Lean Thinking by James Womack & Daniel Jones

IP0208 Entrepreneurship Development

Prerequisites (if any):

Objectives:

  • To make the students understand the concepts & broad principles of contents of the course

  • Develop conceptual framework of the course

  • Sensitizes the students of the importance of course in real life environment

Unit I :- Introduction: Status of youth employment – Global, Asian and Indian scenario, employment by organized and unorganized sectors in India, challenges and opportunities in turning job seekers into job creators, An entrepreneurship as an alternative.

Unit II :- Types of Organizations and Current issues: The Government policy environment, problems in current youth environment, problems in India, Education gaps, role of stakeholders in entrepreneurship – Government, NGOs, financial institutions, corporate sector, industrial parks, educational and training institutes, Overview on rules and regulations for different types of business units.

Unit III :-Entrepreneurship Qualities: Assessment of entrepreneurship potential and aptitude in an individual, qualities necessary to be a successful entrepreneur, developing entrepreneurship qualities, risk aware culture, communication skills, Case studies from different entrepreneurship development institutes like MCED, MITCON, BYST, RUDSETI.

Unit IV:- Project Selection and feasibility study: Selection of project, market research and survey, areas of business opportunities, demand and supply analysis, overview on methods of forecasting, launching and marketing the products and services, sales and distribution, project feasibility study – market feasibility, technical feasibility, sources of finance, financial feasibility – project costing and bu dgeting, product costing.

Unit V :- Project formulation – preparation of feasibility report and specifications, cost of project- contracting, labour and equipment, Accounting – preparing financial statements like projected profit and loss, balancing, rate of return, investment decisions, ratio analysis, socio-economic cost benefit analysis.

Unit VI

Project Administration – cash flow planning, project scheduling, PERT, CPM, project crashing, project overrun cost, time cost trade off, participation and team work, motivation, group dynamics, recourse planning and capacity utilization.

Outcomes: At the end of the course student will be in a position to

  • List down the factors that influence the application of the course content in the industrial environment

  • Undertake final year project work based upon the application of the course content

  • Identify areas for research-oriented work based on the course content

TEXT BOOK

    1. S J Phansalkar, Making Growth Happen – Learning from First Generation Entrepreneurs.

    2. Rabindra N Kanungo, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Models for Development.

REFERENCE BOOKS:

  1. Dr J. S. Juneja, Small and Medium Enterprise: Challenges and opportunities

  2. Kondalah, chukka; Enterprise in the new millennium, McGraw-Hill publication.

  3. Harvard Business Review on Enterprise : Harvard Business Review, McGraw-Hill publication.

  4. Gopal & Ramamurthy; Project management Handbook, Macmilan.

  5. Prassanna Chandra; Preparation, Appraisal, Budgeting and Implementation.



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