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soft Office Application Introductory

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For Microsoft Office 2000, Office XP, and* Future Office Versions

lnxtudes: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, FrontPage,

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Speech Recognition, and Windows : Business, Career, Personal, and Educational Applications

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William R Pasewark. Sr . Ph.D.

Professoi Emei itus. Business Education. Texas Tech Unwersrty " ' ;■ *-. -«s

Scott G. Pasewark, B.S.* "'

Occupational Education, Computei Technologist - ' l;' \

William R Pasewark, Jr . Ph.D . CPA

Piofessoi Accounting. Texas Tech University ""• '"vi"

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Carolyn Pasewark Denny. M Eel.

irter Consultant. Reading and Math Certified Elementary Teacher, K-*2 CertifS&ct-CoB^fer,!

Heather Treadaway Pasewark, B A.

English/Computer Teachei

Frank M Stogner. MBA. CPA

International Business

Jan Pasewark Stogner, MBA

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Beth Pasewark Wadsworth, B.A

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Chris Elkhiil

Sr. Vice President, School

Chris Katsaropoulos

Managing Editor

Robert Gaggin

Product Manager

Kim Ryttel

School Marketing Manager

Steven Deschene and Efrat Reis

Cover and Internal Design

Jodi Dreissig

Product Manager

Kelly Robinson

Production Editor

Trevor Kallop

Sr. Manufacturing Coordinator

CEP Inc.

Developmental Editor

GEX Publishing Services

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COPYRIGHT © 2003 Course Technology, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. Thomson Learning ™ is a trademark used herein under license.

Appendix D, Keyboarding Touch System Improvement, is an excerpt from Keyboarding Skill Builder for Computers, Copyright 1996 by William Robert Pasewark, Sr.

All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

3456789 BM 05

For more information, contact Course Technology. 25 Thomson Place, Boston, Massachusetts, 02210. Or find us on the World Wide Web at:

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, Web distribution, or information storage and retrieval systems—without the written permission of the

publisher.

For permission to use material from this text or product, contact us by Tel (800)730-2214 Fax (800)730-2215

Disclaimer

Course Technology reserves the right to revise this publication and make changes from time to time in its content without notice.

Microsoft and the Office logo are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. Course Technology/Thomson Learning is an independent entity from Microsoft Corporation and not affiliated with Microsoft Corporation in any manner. This text may be used in assisting students to prepare for a Microsoft Office Specialist exam. Neither Microsoft Corporation, its designated review company, nor Course Technology/Thomson Learning warrants that use of this publication will ensure passing the relevant Microsoft Office Specialist exam.

ISBN 0-619-05599-5 (National). ISBN 0-619-05575-8 (Texas)

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To Students

Knowing how to use computers will be a valuable asset to help you in the business, career, personal, and school roles in your life—now and in the future.

Welcome to Microsoft Office Applications, a book that will help you to be a confident and proficient computer user.

Now, please go to the Introduction Unit, page 1 (Introduction 1), and start learning about your computer.

To Teachers

A New Book for a New Approach to Teaching Computer Applications

The instructional strategies and the funding for computer application courses are changing dramati­cally. For example:

1. Students now enter Texas BCIS I and II courses with a very wide variety of computer skills acquired from previous computer instruction and from out-of-class computer experiences.

2. Restricted budgets are making it more difficult to purchase new textbooks to upgrade to new ver­sions of Microsoft Office.

To overcome these and other teaching challenges, schools need a textbook with a new approach. Microsoft Office Applications (MOA) is just such a book.

Microsoft Office Applications: A Flexible Approach for Teaching Office

1. The Book Contains:

a. What to Dos that are general instructions for all Microsoft Office versions. They describe how to create a document or a file.

b. Hot Tips in the margins are specific instructions that help students to execute functions or oper­ations, such as how to save, print, and close a document.

Students apply computer skills developed in the Tasks to produce realistic documents for their busi­ness, career, personal, and school life skills. There is a model, "Your Application Completed," for each application.

2.The Supplements Are:

Booklets of 150 pages that contain the familiar Step-by-Step, specific instructions for Tasks in the book. There are separate supplements for Office 2000, Office XP, and Office 2003. Supplements will be available for new Office versions so that you can teach with the same MOA book when you upgrade your software, or if you have labs with multiple versions of Office.

Supplements can be used by less experienced students who need the support of version-specific Step-by-Step instructions.

With the adoption of the MOA book, Step-by-Step Supplements are also available without charge on the Instructor Resources CD and from .

Origin of the Microcomputer Office Applications Books

At numerous presentations and conferences during the last several years, the authors asked teachers to record their three major problems when teaching computer classes. The problems were compiled into a master list of Top Problems Teaching Computers. The authors wrote Microcomputer Office Applications to help teachers overcome these challenges.

635

SEVEN Challenges Teaching Computer Applications ONE Solution: Microsoft Office Applications

by Pasewark and Pasewark

Challenge #1. Students have a wide range of computer experiences, learning abilities, and interests.

Solution:

Novice students use the MOA text and the version-specific supplement that contains Step-by-Step instructions.

Competent students use the MOA text and margin notes.

Skilled students use the MOA text with enrichment exercises such as Extra Challenge, Internet, Teamwork, simulations, and Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Projects.

Depending upon their level of computer competencies, students are supported by basic computer information in segments of the MOA book such as Computer Concepts, Windows Basics, Concepts for Microsoft Office Programs, and a Review of Microsoft Office Basics. Computer-assisted assessment programs are available for these computer competency aides.

Challenge #2. Students prefer doing instead of reading-Solution:

MOA books have an uncluttered, easy-to-read page layout; clear, concise instructions; enumerated Step-by-Step instructions that are easy to follow; and numerous screen captures that help students see what they need to do.

Challenge #3. Textbook budgets are limited. Solution:

Adopt MOA and you no longer have to purchase a new text every time Microsoft releases a new version of Office. An inexpensive, updated, Step-by Step Instruction supplement is available when you change software.

ONE BOOK FOR ALL VERSIONS

2000XP™™fws

Challenge #4. Teachers and students want a plentiful supply of interesting, realistic applications.

Solution:

MOA contains more than 300 activities which include an on-going Integrated Simulation at the end of each unit, as well as Critical Thinking and Problem Solving projects that range in length from 15 min­utes to 10 hours. There are applications for business, career, personal, and school life-skills.

635

Challenge #5. Students lack business skills. Solution:

In addition to business applications, the appendices contain model document formats, succinct guides for writing letters and e-mails, and skill building for keyboarding and the numeric 10-key touch systems.

Challenge #6. Space is limited on the computer desk. Solution:

The top-spiral, easel-back, standalone MOA text has a smaller footprint, is easy for students to handle, and places the copy at eye-level.

Challenge #7. Teachers want to meet TEKS and Microsoft Office Specialist requirements. Solution:

The Texty award-winning, Texas-based team of Pasewark authors have written exercises that cover all TEKS requirements for BC1S 1 in the MOA Introductory book and BC1S 11 in the Advanced book. The two texts, when used together, include all of Microsoft Office Specialist competencies at the Core level.

In addition:

1. Microsoft Office Applications by Pasewark and Pasewark includes more Microsoft Office software programs than any other high school text on the market: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access, Outlook, Publisher, FrontPage, Speech Recognition, and Windows.

2. MOA books are flexible. For example, they can be used in schools with labs that have different versions of Microsoft Office; in classes with students who have a wide variety of abilities and instructional patterns; and as the "core" or "extra" applications book.

3. Students must keep "focused on task." An appealing, interesting, easy-to-succeed, user-friendly computer applications book can encourage students to remain "on task." The new learning approach in Microcomputer Office Applications can help.

4. Getting Ready activities include these important work traits: Developing Good Computer Work Habits; Help! Where Can I Get It?; and Verifying Your Work.

Teaching Support Materials

The following support materials will help you to teach better, faster, and easier:

Assessment, Testing, and Certification SAM and TOM

Experience the power, ease, and flexibility of SAM and TOM. These innovative software tools provide the first truly integrated technology-based training and assessment solution for your applications course.

Use SAM to measure your students' proficiency in Microsoft Office applications through real-world, performance-based questions and monitor their success through detailed reports.

TOM works in conjunction with SAM to cultivate the ultimate learning experience. With TOM for Microsoft Office, students learn Office concepts and skills actively through both guided and self-directed instruc­tion. Now you're free to teach the way you want to teach, and students are free to excel!

ExamView®

ExamView® is a powerful objective-based test generator that enables you to create paper, LAN, or Web-based tests from test banks designed specifically for your Course Technology text. Utilize the ultra-efficient QuickTest Wizard to create tests in less than five minutes by taking advantage of Course Technology's question banks, or customize your own exams from scratch.

Microsoft Office Specialist Program

This Introductory book, with its companion Advanced book, will prepare students for the Microsoft Office Specialist Core exam for Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Outlook, and FrontPage.

To learn more about Microsoft Office Specialist, visit .

Start-Up Checklist

For the Start-Up Checklist, see Appendix M.

Teaching Schedule and Resources

These charts in the Annotated Instructor Edition will help you plan your BCIS I course and facilitate reports to your school administration.

The headings of the charts for the Units in the book are: Days, Activities, Resources on CD, Microsoft Office Specialist Objectives, and TEKS objectives.

Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS)

Headings on this chart, "Activities that Relate to the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills," include TAKS Objectives, MOA Activities, and Page Number.

Acknowledgments and Author's Credentials Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully thank Rhonda Davis for coordinating the preparation of the manuscript and for using her business experiences to write the Access unit and several other segments of this book.

We also thank Billie Conley, a Lubbock High School computer teacher, for reviewing the manuscript and preparing the Business Students Association simulation that is in the Advanced book.

All of our books are a coordinated effort by the authors and scores of professionals working with the publisher. The authors appreciate the dedicated work of all these publishing personnel and particularly those with whom we have had direct contact:

Course Technology: Jodi Dreissig, Chris Elkhill, Chris Katsaropoulos, Robert Gaggin, Dave Lafferty, Kelly Robinson, and Kim Ryttel. We particularly want to recognize Tom Tyner, Regional Sales Manager, for his valuable advice about this book.

Custom Editorial Productions Inc.: Anne Chimenti, Jan Clavey, Jean Findley, Rose Marie Kuebbing, Betsy Newberry, and Megan Smith-Creed.

Many professional Course Technology sales representatives make educationally sound presentations to teachers about our books. We appreciate their valuable work as "bridges" between the authors and teachers.

Dedication

This book is dedicated in memory of Warren Caster and Diann Corbin. Their thoughtful acts of kind­ness and service as sales representatives have earned them the respect, admiration, and friendship of countless teachers and many authors. — Bill Pasewark, Sr.

635

Authors' Commitments

In writing this book, the authors have dedicated themselves to creating a comprehensive and appealing instructional package to make teaching and learning an interesting, challenging, and rewarding expe­rience for students and teachers.

With these instructional materials, teachers can create realistic learning experiences so learners can successfully master concepts, knowledge, and skills that will help them live better lives — now and in the future.

The authors' commitment to students and teachers is a successful pedagogical formula for writing textbooks as evidenced by their award-winning books.

Award-winning Books by the Pasewarks

The Text and Academic Authors Association recognizes the best textbooks of the year in eight academic disci­plines. The Pasewarks won a Texty Award for their following computer books:

2002, Microsoft Office XP, Introductory Course

2001, Microsoft Works 2000

2000, Microsoft Office 2000, Introductory Course

1994, Microsoft Works 3.0, Macintosh

In 1994, their book, The Office: Procedures and Technology, won the first William McGuffey Award for Textbook Excellence and Longevity and a Texty Award for the best business book of the year.

About the Authors

Pasewark LTD is a family-owned business, based in Lubbock, Texas. We use Microsoft Office in our business, career, personal, and family lives. Writing this book, therefore, was a natural project for the eight authors in our family who are identified on the title page of this book.

The authors have written more than 100 books about computers, accounting, and office technology.

Pasewark authors are members of several professional associations that help authors write better books and have been recognized with numerous awards for classroom teaching.

Other Microsoft Office Applications Books in this Series

Microsoft Office Applications, Advanced

Applications are more challenging than in the Introductory book. Along with the Introductory book, prepares students for Microsoft Office Specialist Core exams for Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Outlook, and FrontPage.

Microsoft Word Applications

Combines the Word units from the Introductory and Advanced books. Prepares students for the Microsoft Office Specialist Word Core exam.

Microsoft Excel Applications

Combines the Excel units from the Introductory and Advanced books. Prepares students for the Microsoft Office Specialist Excel Core exam.

635

Introduction to Microsoft Office Unit.................................................................IN-1

Part 1 - Review of Microsoft Office Basics.........................................................................IN-3

Part 2 - Using the Internet....................................................................................IN-20

Part 3 - Getting Ready.......................................................................................IN-27

Introductory Microsoft Word Unit...................................................................IW-1

Part 1 - Word Basics and Editing................................................................................IW-3

Part 2 - Helpful Word Features................................................................................tW-22

Part 3 - Format Text and Paragraphs...........................................................................IW-39

Part 4 - Working with Documents..............................................................................IW-58

Part 5 - Desktop Publishing..................................................................................IW-79

Integrated Simulation - Association for Hearing Impaired Children...................................................IW-99

Introductory Microsoft Excel Unit....................................................................IE-1

Part 1 - Excel Basics..........................................................................................IE-3

Part 2 - Spreadsheet Appearance...............................................................................IE-17

Part 3 - Organizing a Spreadsheet..............................................................................IE-36

Part 4 - Calculation.........................................................................................1E-49

Part 5 - Function Formulas...................................................................................IE-62

Part 6 - Charts.............................................................................................IE-75

Integrated Simulation - Association for Hearing Impaired Children....................................................IE-95

Introductory Microsoft PowerPoint Unit...............................................................IP-1

Part 1 - PowerPoint Basics.....................................................................................IP-3

Part 2 - Enhancing a PowerPoint Presentation.....................................................................IP-14

Part 3 - Working with Visual Elements...........................................................................IP-41

Integrated Simulation - Association for Hearing Impaired Children....................................................IP-66

Introductory Microsoft Access Unit..................................................................IA-1

Part 1 - Access Basics........................................................................................IA-3

Part 2 - Finding and Ordering Data.............................................................................IA-24

Part 3 - Creating Forms and Reports, Integrating..................................................................IA-38

Integrated Simulation - Association for Hearing Impaired Children....................................................IA-55

Introductory Microsoft Outlook Unit.................................................................10-1

Part 1 - Outlook Basics and E-mail...............................................................................10-3

Part 2 - Calendar and Other Outlook Tools.......................................................................10-18

Integrated Simulation - Association for Hearing Impaired Children....................................................10-37

Introductory Publisher/FrontPage Unit..............................................................IPF-1

Part 1 - Publisher Basics.....................................................................................IPF-3

Part 2 - FrontPage Basics....................................................................................1PF-16

Integrated Simulation - Association for Hearing Impaired Children...................................................IPF-40

Introductory Speech Recognition Unit...............................................................SR-1

Part 1 - Speech Recognition Basics..............................................................................SR-3

Introductory Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Projects Unit..........................................CT-1

APPENDICES

Appendix A. Windows Basics...................................................................................A-l

Appendix B. Computer Concepts................................................................................B-l

Appendix C. Concepts for Microsoft Office Programs................................................................C-l

Appendix D. Keyboarding Touch System Improvement...............................................................D-l

Appendix E. Ten-Key Numeric Touch System Improvement...........................................................E-l

Appendix F. Models for Formatted Documents.....................................................................F-l

Letters—Business, F2; Personal, F3; Personal-Business, F4; Agenda, F6; Itinerary, F7; Memorandum, F8; Minutes, F9;

Reference List, F10; Report, Fll; Resume, F12; Topic Outline, F13; Envelope Guide, F14; and State Abbreviations, F14

Appendix G. Task Filenames and Descriptions.......................................Located on Instructor Resources CD-ROM

Appendix H. Application Filenames and Descriptions.................................Located on Instructor Resources CD-ROM

Appendix 1. E-mail Writing Guides...............................................................................1-1

Appendix J. Letter Writing Guides...............................................................................J-l

Appendix K. Proofreader's Marks................................................................................K-l

Appendix L. The Microsoft* Office Specialist Program................................................................L-l

Appendix M. Start-Up Checklist.................................................................................M-l

Glossary......................................................................................GL-1

Index..........................................................................................IX-1

635

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Part 1 - Review of Microsoft Office Basics Part 2 - Using the Internet Part 3 - Getting Ready

Introduc

Introduction 635

Part 1 - Review of Microsoft Office Basics

Tasks

1-Start an Application .....................................4

2-Menus, Toolbars ........................................5

3-Open Existing Document .................................7

4-Save, Close.............................................9

5-Preview, Print..........................................10

6-Get Help ..............................................12

7-Use Office Assistant.....................................15

8-Quit an Application .....................................16

Applications

1-Open, Save, Preview, Print, Close..........................17

2-Get Help ..............................................18

Part2 - Using the Internet

Tasks

1-Access, Search .........................................21

2-Use URLs, Print ........................................23

3-Add Favorites .........................................24

Applications

1- Access, Search, Print, Add Favorites .......................25

2- Access, Print, Add Favorites..............................26

Part 3 - Getting Ready

Urgent and Important Notice Before You Start ...............28

Terminology...........................................28

Tasks and Applications..................................28

Type Styles ...........................................28

Developing Good Computer Work Habits ...................29

Review Pack CD........................................29

Help! Where Can I Get It? ................................30

Verify Your Work.......................................30

Sample Pages .........................................30

Sample Page from this Book..............................31

Sample Page from the Step-by-Step Instructions, Supplement . .32 Learning Boxes ........................................33

Introduction 635

IlililillB Project 18: Your Choice!, continued M

3. List sources to help you solve the problem—for example, search the Internet, use the library, and interview people.

4. Record data using various software programs, such as Word for notes about the problem or Access or Excel to store data about the problem.

5. Synthesize and analyze the notes and data.

6. Record your conclusions.

7. Decide if you want to share your project with people who may be able to improve your project or help you achieve your goals.

This project may continue far beyond the end of your com­puter course.

Project 19: 9/11 and Terrorism H

You may have lived through one of the most significant incidences in the history of our country and possibly the world: the fateful terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001.

Your mission is to record on paper how the 9/11 attacks may affect your life. Take a long "timeout" to think about what you have learned from your classes at school, read­ing, television, personal discussions, and what you can find on the Internet.

Some parts of your report might include personal safety, new careers, non-productive costs of terrorism, military service, personal and business travel, computer security, relations with other cultures, travel restrictions, whom do you trust, the role of faith, educating yourself about terrorism, and what you can do to help.

£;.2iJ01 George Marengo,

Introductory Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Projects 10

Objectives

After completing this Part, you should be able to:

• Start an Office application from Windows.

• Use menus and toolbars.

• Open an existing document.

• Save and close a document.

• Preview and print a document.

• Use the Help system.

• Use the Office Assistant.

• Quit an application.

Introduction 635

objectives

Project 17: Thought for the Day H

Mr. Garses, the principal of your school, concludes the morning announcements with a "Thought for the Day," which is a quote or proverb that provides an inspira­tional, humorous, or thought-provoking idea. As a Gold Key member, it is your turn next week to provide each day's "Thought for the Day." Submit a list of five appro­priate quotes or proverbs that would be appropriate and document your sources. Some Internet sources include:

• Bartlett's Familiar Quotations at:

http://www.bartleby. com/100/

• Simpson's Contemporary Quotations at:

http://www.bartleby. com/63/

Project 18: Your Choice! M

Select a problem that has been "bothering you" and use the computer to help you understand and develop an approach to solving the problem.

The problem can be about any of the different phases of your life. For example: personal—wanting to develop more friendships; school—not enough time for all of your activities; business—trying to decide what car to purchase; family—how to improve relations with a parent or sister; career—which occupation seems best for me; health—how to overcome a physical or mental ailment; finances—what should I be doing now to be financially independent later; social—what really causes poverty; futuristic—develop a 5- and 10-year plan for your life; ideological—what ideals should I develop now to have a happy life.

Here is an approach to solving your problem:

1. Identify the problem with a name.

2. Develop a time schedule for solving the problem using Microsoft Outlook.

(continued on next page)

Introductory Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Projects 9

What To Do

Click the Start button to open the Start menu. Point to Programs (if using Windows 2000), or All Programs (if using Windows XP), and click Microsoft PowerPoint (you may need to click Microsoft Office first). PowerPoint starts, and a blank presentation appears. See Figure 1-1.

Figure 1-1 A blank presentation (in Office XP)

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2. Click the Close button on the right side of the menu bar to close the blank presentation. The PowerPoint program will remain open.

3. Open the Start menu again.

4. Point to Programs (Windows 2000), or All Programs (Windows XP), and then click Microsoft Word (you may need to click Microsoft Office first). Word starts and a blank document appears. Leave Word and PowerPoint open for the next Task.

Computer Concept

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Introduction 635

Project 14: Pocket Computers Hi

Pocket computers can be used with desktop compuicrs to increase the efficiency of both devices. You work for a small business and would like to equip the three sales­people with pocket computers. In order for your mjn^qc r to approve the expenditure, you need to provide him wiih information and statistics on how pocket computers work in conjunction with home office computers, and how they can increase the productivity of your salespeople. Research these topics using the Internet or resources at the local library. You might also want to visit an electronics store to get information on models and pricing, and also lo see a demonstration of a pocket computer. Be sure to hncl information on how the functions of a pocket computer and a desktop computer can be linked. Prepare a report for your manager that outlines your research.

Project 15: Proofreading Mi

Prepare a presentation for the class about proofreading. You can use the Internet to find rules and hints about good proofreading skills. Create a presentation with at least five slides that uses the information you find. You may want to review the following Web site:

http://cal.bemidji.msus.edu/WRC/Handouts/ProofandEditMml Project 16: Purchasing a Computer 13

1. Your employer, Mr. Berime, is planning to purchase a new computer, but cannot decide what kind to buy. To help with the decision, create a table that compares the func­tions and features of different operating systems, envi­ronments, and utilities.

2. Research the options available in your area for getting connected to an online service. Compare prices and ser­vices of at least three of these providers and make a rec­ommendation to your employer that includes the results.

Introductory Critical Thinking and Problem Sc

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What To Do

Your screen should display the opening screen for the Word program. See Figure 1-2, which shows the opening screen for Word 2002. Look carefully at the parts of this screen labeled in Figure 1-2. These basic parts of the screen are similar in all of the Office programs and are discussed in Table 1-1.

Figure 1-2 Word opening screen (in Office XP)

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toolbar

Formatting toolbar

Inserted point

Title bar

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Table 1-1 Understanding the opening screen

Item

Function

Title bar

Displays the names of the Office program and the current file.

Menu bar

Contains the menu titles from which you can choose a variety of commands.

Standard toolbar

Contains buttons you can use to perform common tasks.

Formatting toolbar

Contains buttons for changing formatting, such as alignment and type styles.

Insertion point

Shows where text will appear when you begin keying.

Scroll bars

Allow you to move quickly to other areas of an Office document.

Status bar

Tells you the status of what is shown on the screen.

Taskbar

Shows the Start button, the Quick Launch toolbar, and all open programs.

Task pane (Office XP and later versions)

Opens automatically when you start an Office application. Con­tains commonly used commands applicable to each application.

(continued on next page)

Introduction 5

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Project 11: Pet Service, continued il

2. You will be visiting three different friends or relatives while you are on vacation. Copy their addresses and phone information from your address list to the instruc­tion sheet so Critter Sitters will know where to reach you with any questions or problems.

Project 12: Phone Directory 13

Make a list of 10 names that you think would be interesting to search for. For example, it could be your own name or the name of a famous person. Use a CD-ROM phone direc­tory or an online directory (such as the Switchboard at: ) to find information about the name and the person. For example, where do they live and how many people share the name.

Project 13: Planning a Trip 13

1. You are planning a trip with a family member or friend. You have $2,000 to spend and will be gone no longer than one week. Choose any destination and any mode of trans­portation. You can use the Internet to get travel, lodging, and entertainment information at sites such as:

• The USA Today Travel Guide at:

h ttp ://www. usa today, com/travel/tfron t. h tm

• The Travel Channel Online Network at:

httpj/travel, discovery, com

2.Prepare a budget showing how much you will spend on each expense, such as transportation, lodging, meals, and entertainment.

3. Prepare an itinerary for each day you will be gone. Refer to Appendix F: Models for Formatted Documents for itiner­ary format.

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Introductory Critical Thinking and Problem S<

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Projects 635

2. Locate on your screen each of the items listed in Table 1-1. Read the function for each item. Office 2000 users: The task pane does not exist in Office 2000.

3. Locate the menu bar and click Edit to open the Edit menu. A list of basic editing commands displays. See Figure 1-3.

4. Click the arrows at the bottom of the Edit menu. An expanded menu of commands displays. See Figure 1-3 (the options on the Edit menu vary slightly between the Office programs).

Figure 1-3 Basic menu vs. expanded menu Edit- \ View.' Insert Fgrmj j Edit | Vjew^ Insert Format

Undo Clear

Ctrl+Z

Jt'

Cut

Ctrl+X

Hill

Copy

Ctrl+C

m

Paste

Ctrl+V

Select A«

Ctrl+A

o Undo Clear Ctrl+Z fcQjj Repeat Clear Ctrl+Y

CutCtrl+X

CopyCtrl+C

|| Office Clipboard.,, % PasteCtrl+V



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