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STANFORD BULLETIN

2011-12









Accreditation

Stanford University is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), 985 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 100, Alameda, CA 94501; (510) 748-9001. In addition, certain programs of the University have specialized accreditation. For information, contact the Office of the University Registrar.

Stanford University is committed to complying with the following requirements enumerated by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) in its accreditation process:

"Core Commitment to Institutional Capacity—The institution functions with clear purposes, high levels of institutional integrity, fiscal stability, and organizational structures to fulfill its purposes.

"Commitment to Educational Effectiveness—The institution evidences clear and appropriate educational objectives and design at the institutional and program level. The institution employs processes of review, including the collection and use of data, which ensure delivery of programs and learner accomplishments at a level of performance appropriate for the degree or certificate awarded."

For more information, see the University's WASC Accreditation web site.

Also, see President Hennessy's statement (pdf) on Stanford's fulfilment of the Core Commitments to Institutional Capacity and Educational Effectiveness.

Nondiscrimination Policy

Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. Consistent with its obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination, including harassment, on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the University's programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding this nondiscrimination policy: the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email).

Fundamental Standard

Students at Stanford are expected to know, understand, and abide by the Fundamental Standard, which is the University’s basic statement on behavioral expectations articulated in 1896 by Stanford’s first President, David Starr Jordan, as follows:

Students are expected to show both within and without the University such respect for order, morality, personal honor, and the rights of others as is demanded of good citizens. Failure to do this will be sufficient cause for removal from the University.

See the "Judicial Affairs and Student Conduct" section of this bulletin for further information on The Fundamental Standard and The Honor Code.

Honor Code

The Honor Code is the University’s statement on academic integrity. It is essentially the application of the Fundamental Standard to academic matters. Provisions of the Honor Code date from 1921, when the honor system was established by the Academic Council of the University Faculty at the request of the student body and with the approval of the President.

The Honor Code reads:

  1. The Honor Code is an undertaking of the students, individually and collectively:

    1. that they will not give or receive aid in examinations; that they will not give or receive unpermitted aid in class work, in the preparation of reports, or in any other work that is to be used by the instructor as the basis of grading;

    2. that they will do their share and take an active part in seeing to it that others as well as themselves uphold the spirit and letter of the Honor Code.

  1. The faculty on its part manifests its confidence in the honor of its students by refraining from proctoring examinations and from taking unusual and unreasonable precautions to prevent the forms of dishonesty mentioned above. The faculty will also avoid, as far as practicable, academic procedures that create temptations to violate the Honor Code.

  2. While the faculty alone has the right and obligation to set academic requirements, the students and faculty will work together to establish optimal conditions for honorable academic work.

See the "Judicial Affairs and Student Conduct" section of this bulletin for further information on The Fundamental Standard and The Honor Code.

Current Information and Accuracy Statement

Every effort is made to ensure that the degree requirement and course information, applicable policies, and other materials contained in the Stanford Bulletin are accurate and current. The University reserves the right to make changes at any time without prior notice. The Bulletin in the form as it exists online at http://bulletin.stanford.edu and http://explorecourses.stanford.edu is therefore the governing document, and contains the then currently applicable policies and information.

Courses of Instruction are available at the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

A non-official pdf of the Bulletin and pdfs of individual sections of the Bulletin are made available for download in September; these pdfs are produced once in September and are not updated to reflect corrections or changes made during the academic year.

Registrar's Office

The Stanford Bulletin is an online publication of the Office of the University Registrar, Stanford University.

Address:
Office of the University Registrar
630 Serra Street
Suite 120
Stanford University
Stanford, California 94305-6032

Students with questions or issues should contact the Student Services Center or file a help ticket with Stanford's HelpSU system. Alumni, staff, or the general public may also file a help ticket to request the Registrar's Office assistance or to ask for information.

Additional information on Stanford University can be obtained through Stanford’s web site at http://www.stanford.edu.

Telephone number for all University departments: Area code: (650) 723-2300.

Academic Calendar 2011-12

This calendar is also available at the University Registrar's web site. All dates are subject to change at the discretion of the University.

Autumn Quarter 2011-12

  • August 1 (Mon) Axess opens for course enrollment.

  • August 29 (Mon) M.D. first-year students, first day of instruction.

  • September 1 (Thu) M.D. second-year students, first day of instruction.

  • September 6 (Tue) Law School instruction begins for 1st-year J.D. students.

  • September 16 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) At-status enrollment deadline in order to receive stipend or financial aid refund by first day of term.

  • September 19 (Mon) MBA first-year instruction begins.

  • September 20 (Tue) New undergraduates arrive; Convocation.

  • September 26 (Mon) First day of quarter; instruction begins; Law School instruction begins for 2nd/3rd-year J.D. & Advanced Degree Students

  • September 26 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Preliminary Study List deadline. Students must be "at status"; i.e., students must have a study list with sufficient units to meet requirements for their status, whether full-time, 8-9-10 units (graduate students only), or approved Special Registration Status. The late study list fee is $200.

  • September 26 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Deadline to submit Leave of Absence for full refund. See Tuition and Refund Schedule: 20111-12 for a full refund schedule.

  • September 29 (Thu) Conferral of degrees, Summer Quarter 2010-11.

  • October 14 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Final Study List deadline. Last day to add or drop a class; last day to adjust units on a variable-unit course. Last day for tuition reassessment for dropped courses or units. Students may withdraw from a course until the Course Withdrawal deadline and a 'W' notation will appear on the transcript.

  • November 14 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Term withdrawal deadline; last day to submit Leave of Absence to withdraw from the University with a partial refund.

  • November 18 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Change of grading basis deadline.

  • November 18 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Course withdrawal deadline.

  • November 18 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Application deadline for Autumn Quarter degree conferral.

  • November 21-25 (Mon-Fri) Thanksgiving Recess (no classes).

  • December 5-11 (Mon-Sun) End-Quarter Period.

  • December 9 (Fri) Last day of classes (unless class meets on Sat.).

  • December 9 (Fri) Last opportunity to arrange Incomplete in a course, at last class.

  • December 9 (Fri, noon) University thesis, D.M.A. final project, or Ph.D. dissertation, last day to submit.

  • December 9 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Late application deadline for Autumn Quarter degree conferral ($50 fee).

  • December 9-16 (Fri-Fri) Law School examinations.

  • December 12-16 (Mon-Fri) End-Quarter examinations.

  • December 20 (Tue, 11:59 p.m.) Grades due.

  • January 12 (Thu) Conferral of degrees, Autumn Quarter.

Winter Quarter 2011-12

  • October 30 (Sun) Axess opens for course enrollment.

  • December 30 (Fri) At-status enrollment deadline in order to receive stipend or financial aid refund by9first day of term.

  • January 9 (Mon) First day of quarter; instruction begins for all students.

  • January 9 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Preliminary Study List deadline. Students must be "at status"; i.e., students must have a study list with sufficient units to meet requirements for their status, whether full-time, 8-9-10 units (graduate students only), or approved Special Registration Status. The late study list fee is $200.

  • January 9 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Deadline to submit Leave of Absence for full refund. See Tuition and Refund Schedule: 2011-12 for a full refund schedule.

  • January 16 (Mon) Martin Luther King, Jr., Day (holiday, no classes).

  • January 27 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Final Study List deadline. Final day to add or drop a class; last day to adjust units on a variable-unit course. Last day for tuition reassessment for dropped courses or units. Students may withdraw from a course until the Course Withdrawal deadline and a 'W' notation will appear on the transcript.

  • February 20 (Mon) Presidents' Day (holiday, no classes; Law and GSB do hold classes).

  • February 22 (Wed, 5:00 p.m.) Term withdrawal deadline; last day to submit Leave of Absence to withdraw from the University with a partial refund.

  • March 2 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Change of grading basis deadline.

  • March 2 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Course withdrawal deadline.

  • March 2 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Application deadline for Winter Quarter degree conferral.

  • March 12-18 (Mon-Sun) End-Quarter Period.

  • March 16 (Fri) Last day of classes (unless class meets on Sat.)

  • March 16 (Fri) Last opportunity to arrange Incomplete in a course, at last class.

  • March 16 (Fri, noon) University thesis, D.M.A. final project, Ph.D. dissertation, last day to submit.

  • March 16 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Late application deadline for Winter Quarter degree conferral ($50 fee).

  • March 16-23 (Fri-Fri) Law School examinations.

  • March 19-23 (Mon-Fri) End-Quarter examinations.

  • March 27 (Tue, 11:59 p.m.) Grades due.

  • April 5 (Thu) Conferral of degrees, Winter Quarter.

Spring Quarter 2011-12

  • February 12 (Sun) Axess opens for course enrollment.

  • March 23 (Fri) At-status enrollment deadline in order to receive stipend or financial aid refund by first day of term.

  • April 2 (Mon) First day of quarter; instruction begins for all students.

  • April 2 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Preliminary Study List deadline. Students must be "at status"; i.e., students must have a study list with sufficient units to meet requirements for their status, whether full-time, 8-9-10 units (graduate students only), or approved Special Registration Status. The late study list fee is $200.

  • April 2 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Deadline to submit Leave of Absence for full refund. See Tuition and Refund Schedule: 2011-12 for a full refund schedule.

  • April 5 (Thu) MBA First-year instruction begins.

  • April 13 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Application deadline for Spring Quarter degree conferral.

  • April 13 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Final Study List deadline. Last day to add or drop a class; last day to adjust units on a variable-unit course. Last day for tuition reassessment for dropped courses or units. Students may withdraw from a course until the Course Withdrawal deadline and a "W" notation will appear on the transcript.

  • May 15 (Tue, 5:00 p.m.) Term withdrawal deadline; last day to submit Leave of Absence to withdraw from the University with a partial refund.

  • May 25 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Change of grading basis deadline.

  • May 25 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Course withdrawal deadline.

  • May 28 (Mon) Memorial Day (holiday, no classes).

  • June 1-7 (Fri-Thu) End-Quarter Period.

  • June 4-8 (Mon-Fri) Law School examinations.

  • June 6 (Wed) Last day of classes.

  • June 6 (Wed) Last opportunity to arrange Incomplete in a course, at last class.

  • June 6 (Wed, noon) University thesis, D.M.A. final project, or Ph.D. dissertation, last day to submit.

  • June 6 (Wed, 5:00 p.m.) Late application deadline for Spring Quarter degree conferral ($50 fee).

  • June 7 (Thu) Day before finals, no classes.

  • June 8-13 (Fri-Wed) End-Quarter examinations.

  • June 14 (Thu, noon) Grades for graduating students due.

  • June 16 (Sat) Senior Class Day.

  • June 16 (Sat) Baccalaureate Saturday.

  • June 17 (Sun) Commencement. Conferral of degrees, Spring Quarter.

  • June 19 (Tue, 11:59 p.m.) Grades for non-graduating students due.

Summer Quarter 2011-12

  • April 15 (Sun) Axess opens for course enrollment.

  • June 15 (Fri) At-status enrollment deadline in order to receive stipend or financial aid refund by first day of term.

  • June 25 (Mon) First day of quarter; instruction begins.

  • June 25 (Mon, 5:00 p.m.) Preliminary Study List deadline.

  • June 25 (Mon) Deadline to submit Leave of Absence for full refund.

  • July 4 (Wed) Independence Day observed (holiday, no classes).

  • July 6 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Final Study List deadline. Final day to add or drop a class; last day to adjust units on a variable-unit course. Last day for tuition reassessment for dropped courses or units. Students may withdraw from a course until the Course Withdrawal deadline and a 'W' notation will appear on the transcript.

  • July 27 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Term withdrawal deadline; last day to submit Leave of Absence to withdraw from the University with a partial refund. See Tuition and Refund Schedule: 2011-12 for a full refund schedule.

  • August 3 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Change of grading basis deadline.

  • August 3 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Course withdrawal deadline.

  • August 3 (Fri, 5:00 p.m.) Application deadline for Summer Quarter degree conferral.

  • August 11-16 (Sat-Thu) End-Quarter Period.

  • August 16 (Thu) Last day of classes.

  • August 16 (Thu) Last opportunity to arrange Incomplete in a course, at last class.

  • August 17-18 (Fri-Sat) End-Quarter examinations.

  • August 21 (Tue, 11:59 p.m.) Grades due.

  • August 31 (Fri, noon) University thesis, D.M.A. final project, or Ph.D. dissertation, last day to submit.

  • August 31 (Thu, 5:00 p.m.) Late application deadline for Summer Quarter degree conferral ($50 fee).

  • September 27 (Thu) Conferral of degrees, Summer Quarter.

Academic Calendar 2011-12

First day of classes and last day of finals

  • Autumn 2012-13: September 24 and December 14

  • Winter 2012-13: January 7 and March 22

  • Spring 2012-13: April 1 and June 12 (Commencement June 16)

  • Summer 2012-13: June 24 and August 17

Contents

STANFORD BULLETIN 1

2011-12 1

Accreditation 1

Nondiscrimination Policy 1

Fundamental Standard 2

Honor Code 2

1. that they will not give or receive aid in examinations; that they will not give or receive unpermitted aid in class work, in the preparation of reports, or in any other work that is to be used by the instructor as the basis of grading; 2

2. that they will do their share and take an active part in seeing to it that others as well as themselves uphold the spirit and letter of the Honor Code. 2

Current Information and Accuracy Statement 2

Registrar's Office 2

Academic Calendar 2011-12 3

Autumn Quarter 2011-12 3

Winter Quarter 2011-12 3

Spring Quarter 2011-12 4

Summer Quarter 2011-12 4

Academic Calendar 2011-12 4

Stanford's Mission 36

A Brief History of Stanford 36

Leland and Jane Stanford 36

The Case for a Liberal Education 36

Stanford Lands and Architecture 36

Current Perspectives 37

Stanford People 37

Looking Ahead 37

University Governance and Organization 38

The Board of Trustees 38

Executive Officers 38

The President 39

Committees and Panels Appointed by the President 39

The Provost 39

Schools of the University 40

The Academic Council 40

Committees of the Academic Council 40

Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU) 40

Admission and Financial Aid 41

Undergraduate Admission 41

Nonmatriculated Study (Undergraduate) 41

Graduate Admission 41

Visas 44

Holds and Rescission 44

Undergraduate Financial Aid 45

Graduate Financial Aid 46

Veterans' Educational Benefits 46

Tuition, Fees, and Housing 47

Undergraduate Tuition 47

Graduate Student Tuition 47

International Students 48

Application Fee 48

ASSU Fees 48

Document Fee 48

Campus Health Service Fee 48

Health Insurance 49

Special Fees 49

Payments 49

Meal Plans 49

Refunds 50

Housing 50

Transfer Work 51

Undergraduate Transfer Work 51

Graduate Residency Transfer Credit 52

Undergraduate Degrees and Programs 53

Degree Programs 53

Degree Requirements 54

A Liberal Education 54

a. Places them out of the requirement, or 56

b. Diagnoses them as needing one, two, or three additional quarters of college-level study. In this case, the requirement can then be fulfilled either by passing the required number of quarters of college-level language study at Stanford or the equivalent elsewhere, or by retaking the diagnostic test at a later date and placing out of the requirement. 56

a. overlapping courses constitute introductory skill requirements (for example, introductory math or a foreign language); 61

b. overlapping courses enable the student to meet school requirements (for example, for two majors within the School of Engineering). Currently, only the School of Engineering has school requirements for its undergraduate majors. 61

Undergraduate Minor 62

Baccalaureate Honors 62

Special Registration Statuses (Undergraduate) 62

Minimum Progress for Undergraduates 63

Conferral of Degrees 63

Graduate Degrees 64

General Requirements 64

Degree-Specific Requirements 69

Advising and Credentials 72

Academic Policies and Statements 73

Registration and Study Lists 73

Records 75

a. Upon request, the University may release Directory Information (see the "Directory Information" section of this bulletin). 76

b. School officials who have a legitimate educational interest in a student's education record may be permitted to review it. A school official is: a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student or volunteer serving on an official committee (or representing a recognized student group), such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her responsibility to Stanford or to the student. 76

c. The University discloses education records without consent to officials of another school, in which a student seeks or intends to enroll, upon request of officials at that other school. 76

d. The University may choose to disclose education records (and information drawn from education records) to either supporting parent(s) or guardian(s) where the student is claimed as a dependent under the Internal Revenue Code. 76

e. The University may inform persons including either parent(s) or guardian(s) when disclosure of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other persons. 76

f. For students under the age of 21, the University may notify either parent(s) or guardian(s) of a violation of any law or policy relating to the use of alcohol or controlled substances. 76

g. The University must provide records in response to lawfully issued subpoenas, or as otherwise compelled by legal process. 76

Examinations 78

Grading Systems 79

Academic Standing 81

Student Academic Grievance Procedure 82

a. Any Stanford undergraduate or graduate student who believes that he or she has been subjected to an improper decision on an academic matter is entitled to file a grievance to obtain an independent review of the allegedly improper decision, followed by corrective action if appropriate. A grievance is a complaint in writing made to an administrative officer of the University concerning an academic decision, made by a person or group of persons acting in an official University capacity, that directly and adversely affects the student as an individual in his or her academic capacity. 82

b. This grievance procedure applies only in those cases involving a perceived academic impropriety arising from a decision taken by: (1) an individual instructor or researcher; (2) a school, department, or program; (3) a committee charged to administer academic policies of a particular school, department, or program; or (4) the University Registrar, the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, the C-USP Subcommittee on Academic Standing, or a Senate committee or subcommittee charged to administer academic policies of the Senate of the Academic Council. This procedure does not apply to: (1) complaints expressing dissatisfaction with a University policy of general application challenged on the grounds that the policy is unfair or inadvisable; (2) individual school, department, or program academic policies, as long as those policies are not inconsistent with general University policy; (3) matters proceeding through the Office of Judicial Affairs; or (4) involuntary leave decisions. 82

c. Individuals should be aware that the University Ombuds Office is available to all Stanford students, faculty, and staff to discuss and advise on any matter of University concern and frequently helps expedite resolution of such matters. Although it has no decision-making authority, the University Ombuds Office has wide powers of inquiry, including into student complaints against instructors. 83

a. Informal Attempts at Resolution: the student first should discuss the matter, orally or in writing, with the individual(s) most directly responsible. If no resolution results, the student should then consult with the individual at the next administrative level, for example, the chair or director of the relevant department or program, or, for those cases in which there is none, with the school dean. At this stage, the department chair or program director, if any, may inform the dean that the consultation is taking place and may solicit his or her advice on how to ensure that adequate steps are taken to achieve a fair result. Efforts should be made to resolve the issues at an informal level without the complaint escalating to the status of a formal grievance. 83

b. The Filing of the Grievance: 83

c. The Response to the Grievance: 83

d. The Filing of an Appeal: 83

a. A copy of the original grievance and any other documents submitted by the grievant in connection therewith. 83

b. A copy of the determination made by the dean on that grievance. 83

c. A statement of why the reasons for the determination of the dean are not satisfactory to the grievant. This statement should specifically address the matters set forth in the Standards for Review in Section 4 below. 83

e. The Response to the Appeal: 83

f. The Request to the President: if the student is dissatisfied with the disposition of the appeal by the Provost, he or she may write to the President of the University giving reasons why he or she believes the grievance result to be wrong (following the general format set forth in subsection 2d.2 above). No more than 30 days should elapse between the transmittal of the Provost’s disposition and the written statement to the President urging further appeal. In any case, the President may agree or decline to entertain this further appeal. If the President declines to entertain the further appeal, the decision of the Provost is final. If the President decides to entertain the further appeal, he or she will follow the general procedures set forth in Section 2e above, and the decision of the President will be final. 84

a. For a grievance concerning a decision of the University Registrar, the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, the C-USP Subcommittee on Academic Standing, or of a Senate committee or subcommittee, the grievant will file his or her grievance with the Provost, rather than with the dean, and the Provost will handle that grievance in accordance with the procedures set forth in Section 2c above. 84

b. There is no appeal of the Provost’s disposition of that grievance, except as may be available under Section 2f above. 84

a. The review of grievances or appeals will usually be limited to the following considerations: 84

b. The time frames set forth herein are guidelines. They may be extended by the relevant administrative officer in his or her discretion for good cause. 84

c. Questions concerning the filing and appeal of grievances should be directed to the Office of the Provost. 84

Undergraduate Education 85

Stanford Introductory Studies 85

Bing Overseas Studies Program 88

Undergraduate Advising and Research 89

Center for Teaching and Learning 90

Graduate Education 91

Graduate Policy 91

Graduate Fellowship Programs 92

Graduate Student Diversity 92

Cross-School Learning Opportunities 92

Graduate School of Business 93

School of Earth Sciences 94

Undergraduate Programs in Earth Sciences 94

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Earth Sciences 94

Graduate Programs in Earth Sciences 94

Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences Graduate Program (EEES) 95

Earth Systems 96

Emmett Interdisiplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER) 101

For joint M.B.A/M.S. students: ENVRES 538, Environmental Science for Managers and Policy Makers (same as OIT 538; ENVRES 539/OIT 539 also fulfills this requirement) and ENVRES 540, Environmental Science for Managers II (same as OIT 540). 102

For all other JDP students: ENVRES 310, Environmental Forum Seminar. 102

Energy 102

Climate and Atmosphere 102

Cleantech 102

Land Use and Agriculture 102

Oceans and Estuaries 102

Freshwater 102

Global, Community, and Environmental Health 102

Sustainable Built Environment. 102

Energy 102

Climate and Atmosphere 102

Cleantech 102

Land Use and Agriculture 102

Oceans and Estuaries 102

Freshwater 102

Global, Community, and Environmental Health 102

Sustainable Built Environment. 102

ENVRES 310. Environmental Forum Seminar 105

ENVRES 315. Environmental Research Design Seminar 105

ENVRES 320. Designing Environmental Research 105

ENVRES 330. Research Approaches to Environmental Problem Solving, taken concurrently with: 105

ENVRES 398. Directed Individual Study in Environment and Resources 105

Energy Resources Engineering 108

and MATH 42. Single Variable Calculus 109

and MATH 20. Calculus 109

and MATH 21. Calculus 109

or CME 100. Vector Calculus for Engineers 109

or CME 104. Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers 109

or CME 102. Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers 109

or CHEM 31X may be substituted for CHEM 31A,B 109

or CS 106X may be substituted for CS 106A,B 109

or CHEMENG 120A 109

a. a course work degree, requiring 45 units of course work 112

b. a research degree, of which a minimum of 39 units must be course work, with the remainder consisting of no more than 6 research units. 112

Environmental Earth System Science 114

EESS 211. Fundamentals of Modeling 114

EESS 212. Measurements in Earth Systems 114

EESS 215. Earth System Dynamics 114

EARTHSCI 300. Earth Sciences Seminar. 114

EESS 211. Fundamentals of Modeling 115

EESS 212. Measurements in Earth Systems 115

EESS 215. Earth System Dynamics 115

EARTHSCI 300. Earth Sciences Seminar. 115

Geological and Environmental Sciences 115

a. Half of the courses used to satisfy the 45-unit requirement must be intended as being primarily for graduate students, usually at the 200 level or above. 120

b. No more than 15 units of thesis research may be used to satisfy the 45-unit requirement. 120

c. Some students may be required to make up background deficiencies in addition to these basic requirements. 120

Geophysics 121

or equivalent knowledge 121

GEOPHYS 182. Reflection Seismology, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 183. Reflection Seismology Interpretation, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 185. Rock Physics for Reservoir Characterization, 3 units 122

ENERGY 120. Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering, 3 units 122

GES 131. Hydrologically-Driven Landscape Evolution, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 184. Journey to the Center of the Earth, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 140. The Earth from Space: Introduction to Remote Sensing , 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 170. Global Tectonics, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 186. Tectonophysics, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 187. Environmental Soundings Image Estimation, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 281. Geophysical Inverse Problems, 3 units 122

CME 200. Linear Algebra with Applications to Engineering Computations, 3 units 122

CME 204. Partial Differential Equations in Engineering, 3 units 122

CME 206. Introduction to Numerical Methods for Engineering, 3 units 122

CME 211. Computer Programming in C++ for Earth Scientists and Engineers, 3 units 122

EE 102A. Signal Processing and Linear Systems I, 4 units 122

ENERGY 160. Modeling Uncertainty, 3 units 122

GEOPHYS 181. Fluids and Flow, 3 units 122

CEE 164. Introduction to Physical Oceanography, 4 units 122

EESS 146A. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation, 3 units 122

EESS 220. Physical Hydrogeology, 4 units 122

ENERGY 121. Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow, 3 units 122

GES 130. Soil Physics and Hydrogeology, 3 units 122

or CHEM 31X Chemical Principles, 4 units 122

or a score of 4-5 on the Chemistry AP exam 122

or PHYSICS 120. Intermediate Electricity & Magnetism , 4 units 122

or CEE 101A. Mechanics of Materials, 4 units 122

or EE 141. Engineering Electromagnetics, 4 units 122

or ME 80. Mechanics of Deformable Bodies, 4 units 122

GES 102. Earth Materials: Introduction to Mineralogy, 3 units 122

GES 110. Structural Geology and Tectonics, 5 units 122

GES 111A. Fundamentals of Structural, 3 units 122

GES 151. Sedimentary Geology and Petrography: Depositional Systems, 4 units 122

a. PHYSICS 20 series (21,22,23,24), or 41 and either 43 or 45 122

b. GES 1A or 1B or 1C 122

c. CME 100 or MATH 51. 122



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